Aquamid Might Be The Wrinkle Filler To Fill ArteFill's Void

Eva S on 23 Feb 2009 at 12:28pm

New York dermatologist Rhonda S. Narins, MD reports from her participation in a study of Aquamid that the 30 patients she has injected so far have experienced no problems and that they "liked it."

The trial is comparing Aquamid to the very popular Restylane in the "smile lines," or nasolabial folds. Dr. Narins also points out that "in a European study conducted by Contura followed patients for up to five years and showed patient and physician satisfaction rates above 90 percent."

Contura, the company submitting an application for Aquamid to the FDA, is a Danish medical technology company that develops and commercializes wrinkle fillers.

Aquamid is made up polyacrylamide and does not contain microspheres, like the ones found in the recently bankrupt ArteFill, Sculptra, or Radiesse. It can be used in the lips and cheeks, and doesn't require skin testing, which are important features for the US market.

Contura's website states that plastic surgeons, dermatologists and cosmetic physicians have performed more than 300,000 Aquamid injections in 40 countries.

Aquamid is not yet available in the United States.

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Comments (0)

Ive had nasolabial folds done 4yrs ago and i've started to notice slight lumps. They are hardly noticeable, but its worrisome that something might happen some years down. DO NOT use any permanent filler. It's not worth it, regardless how many positive studies they throw at you
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hi, please advise against aquamid, once it is in..thats it, not many people can remove it at all, which anyway involves piercing the skin and trying to squeeze it out.It can go into lumps and even becomeinfected years later. dont want to exaggerate but it is one thing i totaly regret having!
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My wife is considering eye and some facial cosmetic surgery in Bangkok. We live in California. Her Dr is recommending Aquamid. Is that a good idea, given that we live in CA, or even at all?
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I had aquamid injected in my lips 3 years ago and I love it. NO side affects. Every product does not work for everybody. There are horror stories with every drug, product, etc.
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the point is that this stuff is EXTREMELY hard to get out and company producing it give FALSE information, stating that it is "easily removable" blatantly not true. I too have it in my lips and face, so far no traumatic effect BUT lumps and unevenness. There is no way I would have had it done if I had known all the facts about it.Which are NOT freely given. I am just hoping I will never develop an extreme reaction like the lady above.
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well my dear i hope you will never a problem like mine, im in hell now for 5 months and noone can remove the aquamid from my cheeks!!! I think you very defensive about aquamid MAYBE YOU WORK FOR THE COMPANY...YOU SHOULD GOOGLE AQUAMID BAD RESULTS by the way google it in italian too,you will be surprised
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I had Aquamid injected in my lips 5 years ago and now i have lumps my lips I have taken Ciproxin and plan to remove the product with surgery
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Giovanna has posted more about her Aquamid experience here, "Aquamid Disaster". Thank you Giovanna for sharing a difficult time in your life.
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i had aquamid injected in my cheeks 2 years ago and suddenly my right side cheek swelled so much that i have to run to an emergency room and i had surgery because they saw an huge abscess,i stayed 4 days in the hospital and i came back home with a drain in my face that i have to do packing every single day...now the area with aquamid became very hard like a stone and the only way to remove it its cutting my face and leave deformed...i will never be the same,can you imagine i paid to be beautiful and i end up with a deformed face...please if someone knows how to remove it without surgery let me know...thankyou so much...I HOPE AQUAMID WILL NEVER BE FDA APROVED because i been miserable for about 2 months.
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It would be impossible for me to assess "what went wrong" without examining you and reviewing your record. That said, there are several reasons why a patient may not see much improvement. If the product is injected at the wrong level it may not add volume. Likewise, if the subcutaneous fat is too soft, it may simply compact and the filler will add little to no net volume. Additionally, and perhaps most importantly, ArteFill and other microsphere-based fillers require the body to produce a fibrous capsule around the spheres, which is the source of the majority of the volume correction. ArteFill, for example, is 80% collagen, which dissolves in a couple months or less. If, for a wide range of reasons, one's body doesn't adequately encapsulate the particles, then volume correction will be suboptimal. In that case, neither you nor your physician can overcome that limitation (nor predict it prior to the *first* injection session). Hope this helps.
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i had artefill injections in my cheek area 4 times costing me over6,000.00 in the last 5 months and theres no difference then when i began can you please tell me what went wrong?
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Glad to see they corrected the article above (it originally claimed Aquamid was collagen). Here's yet another edit for you: Sculptra doesn't contain microspheres, so I'm not sure why it's listed along with ArteFill and Radiesse. Also, IMHO, permanent fillers really need to be treated with respect (not fear, but respect) since, as opal111 pointed out, they're permanent and require the same care as surgery (which also has permanent consequences). --David C. Pearson, M.D. Board-Certified, American Board of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
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the most important point left out of this information is that it is permanent, and it can form lumps!..it is hard to remove and. I speak from esperience and also know of another person who has had great difficulties finding someone with the ability to remove it
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A small point of correction: Aquamid is *not* "a collagen formulation." It is a polyacrylamide hydrogel. This is very different and is why Aquamid is considered a "permanent" filler. --David C. Pearson, M.D. Board-Certified, American Board of Facial Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
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