What is the best scar treatment cream/oil for my breast reduction scars? (Photo)

I am using bio oil on my scars. I am 14 weeks post op from my breast reduction and lift. Is Platos or Malarose a better choice! I have never seen them, but, I keep seeing those product names popping up here on RealSelf. Please give me your professional opinion. I am diabetic and scar very easily so I want to get them fading now.

Doctor Answers 8

What is the best scar treatment cream/oil for my breast reduction scars?

Congratulations on having had the breast reduction procedure; it is one of the most patient pleasing operations we perform.
Time tends to improve the appearance of scars. You will find that the scars will improve in appearance even after a year has gone by. Your plastic surgeon will likely have his/her recommendations for you.

Sometimes the use of silicone-based products (gel or sheeting) are helpful. In the event of unfavorable scarring steroid injection may be helpful. Sometimes scar revision surgery and careful scar management afterwards may be helpful.
Best wishes.

Post operative scar treatment.

Hi there.  I have patents wear tape on their scars for 3 - 6 months.  Any sort of tape will do.  It provides a little bit of pressure that is known to help scars mature (fade and flatten).  Also, any of the over the counter silicone sheets will likely help. You can find them in the first aid section of your pharmacy.  Make sure you check with your surgeon before using tape or silicone sheeting.  Scars usually take 6 - 12 months to mature in adults, longer in children.

From your photos, it looks like your healing is right on schedule!

Lisa Lynn Sowder, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 67 reviews

Bio-oil for scar reduction.

Many studies have confirmed that many (most?) topical products for scar improvement are essentially worthless. Silicone scar sheets have been shown to reduce hypertrophic scarring in susceptible individuals, but may not have much benefit in the majority of patients who otherwise heal "normally."

Certain topical pharmaceuticals in weaker formulations, as well as non-pharmaceuticals such as Vitamin E oil, various bio-oils, tea tree oils, etc. show nice before and after photographs, but the hard science is lacking as far as statistically-significant scar-reducing benefits (or we would all be using them).

Though I cannot show hard science in my own regimen, I recommend use of topical scar recovery gel twice daily starting one week post-op, Vitamin E oil massage of the scars starting at 3 weeks post-op, and silicone scar sheets or pads at 4 weeks if there seems to be any sign of hypertrophy. Skin irritation and inflammation increases scarring, so scar pads have to be used carefully and judiciously to avoid irritation. Ultraviolet (sun or tanning beds [BAD]) should be avoided for 6-12 months or until scars have faded completely. No magic here, and probably just my own personal "garlic necklace" to ward off bad scars, but it seems to work for my patients most of the time. And yes, I still have a few bad scars no matter how accurately I close the incisions, or how tiny the sutures, or how delicate the tissue handling!

Your breasts look as if you have residual areolar pigment in the vertical limbs of your inverted-T scar beneath your new smaller areolas, so if that is the case, this will not fade regardless of what you do. The rest of your scars look pretty good, and time, more than anything else, will give you the best result, such as my patient in the web reference below, whose scars in the after photo are at 7 weeks post-op. Best wishes! Dr. Tholen

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 239 reviews

Scar Management

Best Scar Management is important to minimize or completely hide from view, the telltale signs of your surgery—namely, scars. Both you and your surgeon want you to have the most minimal scarring possible. There are many possible causes for scars that are enlarged or not healing well. Unsightly scars are most commonly due to genetics, underlying medical conditions, or improper scar/wound care. The last part is very important and patients can make a noticeable difference in their scars’ appearance by following best scar management practices.

Best scar cream for breast reduction

Breast reduction surgery can lead to visible scars. I would suggest twice daily application of Platos Scar Serum on your scars once the sutures are removed.

Best,
Dr. Karamanoukian 
Los Angeles 

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Treatment for Scars

Whether it is for breast reduction or abdominoplasty, I have my patients use one inch micropore paper tape for two months after surgery. I have been very happy with the results. There is no need to use anything more expensive.
I also have patients tan the areas to be operated on before surgery and after the two month tape treatment. This has the effect of minimizing the scar ( if the patient tans well, of course ). 

Ahmet R. Karaca, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

What is the best scar treatment cream/oil for my breast reduction scars?

Your scar/incisions seem to be healing very nicely. Any of the over the counter creams/oils/ointments/sheeting work.. I offer a prescription scar gel that is compounded in a pharmacy thus is doctor's strength... 

Breast scar management

Thank you for your question. Breast incisions can be managed using a multimodal approach:
1) Scar massage - starting as soon as the surgical dressings come off and the incisions are sealed
2) Silicone sheets or scar gels for about six months to year
3) Embrace - a tension reducing dressing for the first 2 months
4) Fractionated lasers to help blend the scar into the background - done as a series, starting about 4 weeks after surgery and repeated every four weeks for six months.
5) Sunscreen to prevent the scars from darkening

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.