What's the best aftercare to reduce the appearance of post-op scarring?

Looking for tips on how to heal and reduce the look of scarring post FTM top surgery.

Doctor Answers 5

What's the best aftercare to reduce the appearance of post-op scarring?

Every plastic surgeon has their own regimen to try to reduce the appearance of post-operative scarring.  There is, unfortunately, no one "best" regimen.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Scar care after Surgery

Thanks for the post. Most plastic surgeons will use some sort of scar therapy regimen, especially in the first three months when the scar goes through the most inflammation. Products that contain silicone, either in cream form or adhesive sheets work well. In addition, using Vitamin C supplements as well as maintaining good nutrition are important. Finally, in double incision cases, restricting excessive upper body movements in the early healing period helps keep tension off the incisions.

Dr. Dadvand

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Minimizing scars

Scar gels work after the wounds are healing well.  Key factors in the healing of any wound are nutrition and vitamin supplements. There are specially formulated vitamins that are designed to optimize your healing that we use from Vitamedica. In addition, we use Arnica and Bromelian to reduce the swelling and bruising. Before and after surgery, nutrition is a key component that is overlooked by almost every patient and surgeon. After the operation, your calorie and protein requirements are increased. We design a nutritional regimen for each patient which is provided to them during the preoperative teaching. In order to meet the calorie and protein requirements after surgery, the patients typically supplement using protein shakes. Calorie and protein intake are recorded on a log that we provide and review at the postoperative visits. The combination of homeopathic medicines, vitamins supplementation, and adequate calorie and protein intake are critical to the wound healing process. Prior to surgery, we ask the patients to stop all of their own supplements as some can cause problems with bleeding during and after surgery.

Postop scar treatment after FTM top surgery

Thank you for your question. The type of scar treatment we usually recommend after top surgery really depends on the type of scar that the patient usually forms after any surgical procedure. For the patient without a history of adverse scarring (keloids or hypertrophic scars) we usually recommend any good silicone based scar gel. It is used morning and night and is used in conjunction with scar massage to keep the scars flat. With continued use the scar pinkness gradually fades and the scars become lighter. For patients that have a history of keloids we generally recommend silastic sheeting which is used as soon as the scars are healed. The sheeting is used and worn continuously except to shower (or as recommended by the manufacturer). We have also had success with IPL laser (intense pulse light laser) to get the redness out of the scars and this can be done when your surgeon determines it is safe to pursue. I hope this helps and best of luck with your healing and the rest of your transition!!

Russell Sassani, MD
Fort Lauderdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Several,scar therapies

There are many scar therapies available that can improve the scarring. Topical therapy that contains silicone is a good option. Scar strips can be found online, Scarguard and Cimeosil are excellent products to apply on scars.

Massage therapy is a good adjunct to topical therapy. Micro needling is another excellent option. All of these can be used and should be use for a year after your surgery. Good luck!

Michael S. Beckenstein, MD
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.