Is it normal to lactate a year after breast augmentation?

I've been lactating for 8 months now, I've done all kinds of hormone test, brain MRI for the pituitary glands and everything comes back normal. I'm 22 years old, never had kids and I'm currently NOT pregnant. I email my doctor when this all started and he said that it impossible for the implants to cause lactation. I did saline implants, he went in from under the armpits and placed the implant in between the muscle. What do you all think?? Whats my next step?

Doctor Answers 10

Lactate after a year of breast augmentation, some advices:

Thanks for sharing your concerns with us. 

It's very uncommon your current situation, I recommend you to go to an endocrinologist consult to see how your hormones are. Also I recommend to stay in close communication with your plastic surgeon and follow his advices.

Respectfully, 
Dr. Emmanuel Mallol Cotes.-


Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 175 reviews

Is it normal to lactate a year after breast augmentation?

Though very rarely consequence of breast implantation, it has been reported in literature search. At this stage after ALL you work up you should see an Endocrinologist to be plAced on appropriate meds to decrease the lactation issues.. 

Lactation post op

Lactation after Breast Augmentation is not uncommon. It may be a response to the normal increase blood flow during the healing process or from being in proximity to the milk glandular tissue during surgery. Lactation after breast augmentation is usually transient and should stop within a few weeks in most cases. If it lasts longer than that it is worth going back to your surgeon for an evaluation.

Lactating after Breast Aug

What you are experiencing is very uncommon and the implants are not the cause of your lactation. You should follow up with your primary doctor and an endocrinologist. Best of luck...

James E. Hardy, MD
Jacksonville Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Breast lactation after breast augmentation

Hi,

Thanks for posting your question. I am happy to try and help you. It is important to remember that a board certified plastic surgeon will be your best resource when it comes to an accurate assessment of your situation, and concerns.

Having said that, I think you have done all the correct things in working this up. Breast surgery may cause this but it would not be a permanent change. Keep your follow up appointment with your endocrinologist.

Best wishes,

Dr. Michael J. Brown
Northern Virginia Plastic Surgeon

Lactation after augmentation

It is not impossible for the implants to cause lactation. It is not that rare.  If you do enough augmentation you will see it.  It is not clear why it happens, but it is good that you have had an endocrinologist work up.  It should stop.

Post-augmentation lactation for 8 months

Thank you for asking about your lactation after breast augmentation.

  • Its medical term is galactorrhea.
  • Your surgeon is mistaken - it can definitely occur after any breast surgery, including augmentation.
  • It is quite rare - more common after having had children, so happening in someone like you is rarer.
  • In a recent French review of all published cases in the medical literature, there are only 34 published cases - of course, most cases are not published.
  • If your pituitary was normal on MRI, you do not have a pituitary adenoma secreting prolaction.
  • If your prolactin levels were tested twice and remain normal, then the possibilities include -

  • An effect of birth control pills.)
  • A galactocoele (milk collection around the implants)
  • Infection
  • Implant or implant placement causing chronic irritation of the nipples with or without galactocoele
  • It seems you had surgery away from home and cannot return to see your surgeon.
  • So -- your next steps are as follows:
  • See a plastic surgeon in Miami - for an ultrasound to look for galactorrhea or other surgical issue. 
  • Give him the citation of the recent article Bouhassire J, Haddad K, Burin dR, Achouche J and Cartier S in Ann Chir Plast Est 2015 Feb; 60(1) 54-60, doi:10.16/j.anplas.2014.07.014. Epub 2014 Aug 19.
  • S/he can go to PubMed and search for it. The article is in French but PubMed has a full abstract in English.
  • Check with your endocrinologist about your prolactin levels - if you have not seen an endocrinologist you need to consult one now.
  • See your GYN about stopping BCP if you take them.
  • If you have a galactocoele, misplaced implants or coated implants you will need surgery.
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes.

Lactation one year after breast augmentation needs investigation.

Because of inflammation some patients can have some lactation for a few weeks after breast augmentation. By one year this should have long since subsided.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Is it normal to lactate a year after breast augmentation?

Hi... thank you for the question... They have been some cases like this through the history of breast implant surgery... It is not clear what causes this, but it is possible. It is important that you have done your Endocrinologist clearance. Keep the follow up with your PS.. This could be due to the pressure that is causing to the mammary gland.  

Luis A. Mejia, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Lactating after breast augmentation

Lactation after breast augmentation is not that rare. I've seen it at least twice. It sounds like an increase in prolactin from pituitary tumor has been ruled out. Birth control pills may also play a part. In my cases, as the breast became less tight feeling, the lactation went away on its own. Ask your gynecologist about birth control pills if that applies to you. Good luck 

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.