Is it normal to loss blood in Liposuction from 130 to 50 ??

Im 26 years old, my wight is 115lb and my tall is 5". I did blood work, and my haemoglobin was 130 after the liposuction it dropped to 50. Is that normal ? If it is not what causes that ? I had liposction in thighs, abdomen and lower back. The doctor removed 5000cc.

Doctor Answers 7

Blood Loss and Lipo

Yes, some blood is lost with liposuction but using a tumescent technique minimizes it. The numbers you mentioned don't match typical values. Best person to discuss this with is your plastic surgeon.

Significant loss of blood as a consequence of liposuction is almost unheard of.

Blood loss with liposuction almost always is extremely minimal. Your description is confusing to me but it sounds as though there's been a sizable decrease. You should really discuss this with your surgeon.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Changes in hemoglobin after liposuction

It's typically measured in grams per deciliter.

Normal hemoglobin levels for women are between 12 and 15 g/dL.

based on the numbers you have given I will assume that you are referring to the equivalent of 13 g/dL her and 5 g/dL.

If these numbers are correct it would represent a 62% Drop in hemoglobin.

The average adults has 5 L of blood.

This would be the equivalent of losing 3 L of blood during your procedure.
This would be highly unusual unless some very vascular structure was a damaged or someone had a significant bleeding disorder.

That amount of blood loss would also be potentially life-threatening monitoring and in intensive care units and would most likely require multiple blood transfusions.

several factors can alter hemoglobin levels such as hydration or dehydration.

Some patients are dehydrated after liposuction which way to give an artificially high hemoglobin level on a blood test.

i'm not questioning your numbers other than that hemoglobin is never seen as either 50 or 130 grams per liter. Based based on the limited information I don't think it's appropriate to make any further statements.


Mats Hagstrom M.D.

Mats Hagstrom, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Liposuction blood dilution

Congratulations on your procedure and thanks for sharing your question. I can appreciate your concern.

I do not recognize the units that you are talking about. The usual normal values are hb 15 and hct 45. In any case liposuction may dilute the values and you may look that you lost a lot of blood with the lab. The bottom line is that once you urinate all the excess volume is highly likely you will recover your base line values. Obviously if your aspirate was very bloody, is likely that the value is real. 

If you are feeling ok those numbers are irrelevant.

Finally, make sure that your doctor is aware of your process. He should be able to guide you best in your care.

Wishing you the best in your journey

Blood loss

While it is common for the count to drop modestly, it would not be typical to drop well over 50%. I wonder if you are VERY early post-op and some of this represents what we call hemodilution from excess fluid in your system. If it is truly 5, be certain your surgeon is aware so proper monitoring/evaluation/treatment can be done.

Robert H. Hunsaker, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Is it normal to loss blood in Liposuction from 130 to 50 ??

Thank you for your question.  Though some blood loss is expected with liposuction most techniques limit it to anywhere from 1-3% of the amount of fluid and tissue removed.  If you are having any symptoms related to low blood counts contact your surgeon to ensure your safety.  

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Blood loss with lipo

Yes your blood count can go down and will depend on the technique used and also how many areas of liposuction you had performed.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.