I have alopecia areata and I feel pain at the paches on my scalp. Why?

It's like a pressure in the hair follicules around the patches. I'm gonna find a doctor to see my problem, but I need your help, Doctors.

Doctor Answers 5

Pain with alopecia areata

Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease,  where the body's own immune system attacks certain hair follicles.  The symptoms can include pain,  stinging or soreness.  The treatment includes an internal workup to rule out internal causes. If there are no internal causes,  then the inflammation needs to be reduced with either topical or injectable corticosteroids. I would recommend you seeing a board certified dermatologist. 


Chicago Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

In general there is no pain associated with alopecia areata. If you are concerned you need to see a doctor for a proper exam

In general there is no pain associated with alopecia areata. If you are concerned you need to see a doctor for a proper exam.  There is not much the Internet can provide aside from general information.

Jae Pak, MD
Los Angeles Hair Restoration Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

Alopecia areata

Ypou are correct that you need to see an expert for the treatment of this condition. If the treatment fails as it often does, you can have scalp micropigmentation to treat it. See an example of SMP treatment in the web reference below. 

William Rassman, MD
Los Angeles Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Alopecia Areata & Pain

I suggest you consult a board certified facial plastic surgeon because the board certified credential ensures you receive the highest quality knowledge, treatment, care and skill available. Please consult a board certified facial plastic surgeon who specializes in hair treatment as well. Best wishes.

Ross A. Clevens, MD
Melbourne Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 95 reviews

Alopecia areata

The treatment of alopecia areata is always non surgical. Dermatologists are experts in the evaluation and treatment of alopecia areata.

Pain is uncommon with alopecia but burning and tingling can occur.

Be sure to get proper advice from the appropriate specialist. Steroid injections are the appropriate treatment for most individuals with patchy alopecia. Topical steroids and minoxidil are also commonly prescribed.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.