Hate my Hollowed Eyes After Blepharoplasty - New York

Went to a well respected top plastic surgeon in...

Went to a well respected top plastic surgeon in new york. Specifically asked md prior to surgery, "will my eye shape change" "will I have a sunken look" and I was told no to both questions. I had some bags under my eyes at the time &thought removing the bag would just give me a more well rested appearance. Well, I hated the results the minute I looked in the mirror after surgery & hate it even more today, five years later. I had beautiful almond shaped eyes, that truly were my best feature on my face. I regret the surgery every day I see my changed face in the mirror. I feel so sad that my beautiful eyes are gone forever. The plastic surgeon made me feel like I was just being overly critical, but I am not. I honestly would do anything to have my eyes back, bags and all. My eyes are now round, when once almond shaped, hollow when once full, now in a downward slant when once slanted upwards....so regretful.

I feel this surgery is just not a surgery that will make anyone more youthful looking or better. By removing fat, that God has placed there for a reason, it can only make one look older and hollow! Today many plastic surgeons are repositioning the fat instead of removing it...oh how I wish one would have suggested that to me.

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Hello, I am a photojournalist working on a story about plastic surgery. Would love the opportunity to speak with anyone who either happy or unhappy with work done recently or years ago. Please contact me at cassi@cassialexandra.com.
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Hello, I am a photojournalist working on a project about plastic surgery. I would love to speak to any of you who are interested in giving insight. Please contact me at cassi@cassialexandra.com
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Hello..how are you? I miss my almond eyes too..and my skin. Nothing is aligned the way it should b. long face aging mouth, 2 revisions on one eye and the other eye is too hollow feel awful
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Not to diminish the devastating outcome so many here have had in any way, but please do realize that it's not an all or nothing situation. Approaches to blepharoplasty are many and varied, and in an ideal world should be tailored to fit the individual anatomical issues and facial/ocular structure. Not all transconjunctival lower blepharoplasty with fat removal is wrong, or necessarily leads to a hollow or sunken appearance. There are many individual cases where conservative fat removal is the proper choice and can yield beautiful results - but the surgeon needs to be skilled in identifying who benefits from that approach and whose anatomical features may put them at risk for hollowness. As with most things, it's not black and white, but a matter of matching the intervention to the specifics of the problem. There are respected oculoplastic surgeons who obtain excellent aesthetic outcomes using varied techniques including fat removal and/or fat repositioning as the individual needs may dictate. For those struggling with a poor aesthetic result, I hope you will one day find a solution or at least resolution. All the best.
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"the surgeon needs to be skilled in identifying who benefits from that approach and whose anatomical features may put them at risk for hollowness." I agree. You have to go to someone who specialties in more then one thing. Too many of them are "one size fits them all" Docs. Of coarse that's going to lead to problems. Another issue is too many of them prefer the invasive ie expensive procedures over the cheaper and safer ones. Fillers now a days can do the same job while giving more natural results.
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In other words, far too many prefer to do what's in their best interest over yours.
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Agree with Stache01. I could find no doctors in my area who even knew about fillers for the tear troughs. And they didn't appear interested in learning about it either. I remember telling my ocular plastic surgeon that volume is the name of the game under the eyes. Of course, I still trusted that he knew best. Hindsight is 20/20 though.
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There are surgeons out there who are "enlightened" and know how to individualize and achieve a natural and rejuvenating outcome. If you can't find doctors in your area, then you will likely need to be willing to travel. Removing fat in and of itself is not always bad; it is anatomy-specific and can be entirely appropriate in some, contraindicated in others. My oculoplastic surgeon actually removed a small amount of fat from my under eye "bags" and grafted it into my upper orbits, for a beautiful result. I also had upper eyelid ptosis repair at the same time, which was difficult but ultimately successful.
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I live in nyc area (known to have some of the "best" "top doctors" in the country. Went to a physicain written up year after year in all the journals and rating publications, board certified, great reputation.....still left with hollowed orbits. Maybe you got lucky but most are still performing procedures taught in the 70's of removing the fat from the orbit creating a concave eye.
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Research enophthalmos (sunken eyes) caused by blepharoplasty. The fat pads removed during surgery creates a more hollow orbit which allows the eyeballs to recede back into their orbit's. This is a real adverse effect, written about in medical journals & publications, that is known to be caused by blepharoplasty & I wonder why it is not included in a patient's signed consent. Fat repositioning is now being touted on this board & elsewhere as the new rejuvenating eye surgery that will avoid the hollowed out look traditional blepharoplasty causes, but before adulating this as the cure-all to address the aging eye, research needs to be done...many on this board are not happy with the results of that surgery either.
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I've heard from two people that had the repositioning procedure done. However, they both complain of hollow eyes now as a consequence. Surprise to me because I took this procedure as an answer to the consequences of the old fashioned fat removal. I still think it's better but apparently no guarantee. Most people don't bother looking at their whole face to understand the causes. Allot of times it's the loss of volume and/or receding of the face that causes your problems. A Mid Face lift and/or some filler/fat can fix your under eyes.
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I am very familiar with enophthalmos, and it can indeed be a scary and serious condition when present to any significant degree. That said, it's not accurate that removing fat pads inevitably leads to enophthalmos. It can, but that would be the exception and worst-case complication, not the norm. Once again, so much depends on the individual anatomy and surgical judgment. Fat pads or eye bags are generally herniated fat - i.e. the fat is already displaced from its original position where it once provided some support and cushioning for the globe. Aggressive removal even after it is displaced *may* result in further weakening of the system, but is certainly not an all or nothing deal. Meronk has a nice discussion of this, and even in his often-referenced crusade to preserve volume in blepharoplasty he defends appropriate removal of the fat pads when the individual anatomy calls for it. Fat repositioning, as it has come to be known, is not without its own risks and complications. Sometimes it can be a nice way to smooth out the contour of the periorbital area, but it isn't an "anatomically correct" solution, in that it doesn't return the protruding fat pouches back where they came from, and carries a risk of contour irregularities and lumps, among other things. Hollowing of the orbit is also a common issue of aging in general, as a side effect of age-related bone and fat loss. Long-term use of bimataprost for cosmetic purposes is also being researched as a contributing factor to peri-orbital fat atrophy and that potential can of worms is still in its infancy. When orbital fat loss is first identified years after blepharoplasty, it's tough to establish a causative effect, as there are many interrelating factors at play. All that said and carefully considered, I am very, very sorry for what you have gone through and understand the devastation you've experienced and continue to deal with. I also do not in any way dismiss your concerns or the points that you make; it is only the blanket assumptions and condemnations that I differ with. Over-aggressive blepharoplasty is indeed harmful, misguided, generally outdated, and aging. However, the judicious and individualized use of a wide range of blepharoplasty techniques can be effective when appropriately matched to the right patient and executed by the right hands. Fat transfer as well as fillers have been effective solutions for some. Best to you.
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I want to say that I mostly agree with what you're saying except this.."Fat pads or eye bags are generally herniated fat". I think that applies more to older people though. I look at everyone's eyes now and pay close attention to the ones with the so called bags. It's practically an obsession of mine. If you just look at their eyes then yes you'll think that it's just herniated fat. However, pull back and you'll more then likely see an actual hollowness around the fat pads. I see this 90% of the time. Removal of the fat would not be rejuvenating. Meronks way if he did take out the fat is leave enough in that you still have a bit of a bag left. He knew better then anyone not to go aggressive. However, that of coarse made people very unhappy. On his reviews people complained allot of that. They wanted that smooth contour.
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"When orbital fat loss is first identified years after blepharoplasty, its tough to establish a causative effect" no it's not...I was not hollow prior to the fat being removed from my eyes...fat (volume) was removed from my eyes & now my eyes are hollow...very easy to establish a cause..I can look at my four older siblings in their 40's and 50's and my parents in their 80's...no blepharoplasties done & no hollow orbits. All you need to do is take a look at the postings on this site...complaints of hollowness post-blepharoplasty are abundant. What is an "over-aggressive blepharoplasty?" This term has been used to explain every person's blepharoplasty that has resulted in hollowness. I don't think the surgeons are overly aggressive, I think they are just performing a surgery that has been taught in medical school since the 70's and now that patients are able to voice their very unpleasing results of hollowness publicly, that it is coming into question why this old school surgery is still being performed. It is finally becoming very clear that blepharoplasty with orbital fat removal does NOT result in a younger or more aesthetically pleasing looking eye over time. You speak of "a wide range of blepharoplasty techniques" whether fat is removed transconjunctivaly or transcutaneously, still net effect is fat removal. "Fat transfer, as well as fillers have been effective solutions for some" ..isn't that wonderful, that after having been told that while you needed the fat removed a few years ago, now we need to replace that deficiency that we created with fat or a filler. But unfortunately, we know that it just doesn't work like that..you can never get back what once was.
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Hi Stache - you're right that the fat pads that can appear with aging are the type of herniated fat I was specifically referring to, but these changes can start occurring quite early in some individuals. I think, in general, if you didn't always have eye bags but do as you get older, it tends to be a change associated with aging. Whether it becomes an issue in your early thirties or late sixties, if it wasn't always present, then aging-associated changes (increased laxity of skin and muscle, thinning skin, etc.) can gradually erode the support system that holds the fat pads where they belong, causing them to protrude, or herniate to some extent. Obviously, individual anatomy differs. Meronk knew not to be overly aggressive, but did perform transconjunctival fat removal regularly. While it's little comfort to those who've had an aggressive blepharoplasty performed resulting in hollowing, there really are many oculoplastic surgeons who are extremely conservative when they choose this approach. It is possible to eliminate the appearance of the bags by removing some of the fat without leaving a hollow orbit. I believe that the "actual hollowness around the bags" you are noticing are often due to the descent of the malar fat pad, which can lead to the so-called "tear trough deformity" or depression often seen below and to the side of the bag. That's another issue that the repositioning approach attempts to address (opening up a whole other can of worms in the process).
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Agree 100%
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Renovation Project, Doctors like Robert Goldberg who's considered one of the best are now saying to avoid fat removal. It's an archaic procedure IMO that only should be used in rare cases. Why Not Traditional Surgery? Aside form the general risks associated with any surgery, blepharoplasty carries with it inherent risks: • If excess skin is taken out, there is a significant chance of lower eyelid retraction. • The scar tissue formed from the incision, even when no skin is taken out, may cause tissue retraction, which changes the shape of the eye. • If fat is removed to get rid of those bags under the eyes, as the skin ages and loses its plumpness, the loss in volume results in a sunken, hollow look – the very opposite of the desired results. Dr. Goldberg adds that the cases where surgical blepharoplasty is truly indicated are rare. http://thebeautyrules.com/fixing-eye-bags-and-sagging-eyelids-without-surgery/ Again, we seem to be mostly on the same page when it comes to how the face plays a role. Things like decent and fat loss. However, you're obviously more of an advocate of fat removal then myself. Admittedly, I'm biased based on all the disasters I've seen from this type of surgery including myself.
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I hav exactly d same issue.. Ps jus told me its repositiong n he ended out taking out my fat i endedcup with hallOw yes nw
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Did Doctor AU ever practice in the United States? Maybe in the 60s?
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I just signed up to say this... I had this problem myself. I was only 24 when I had this surgery. I had no clue what was to happen. I just wanted a fresh look after some hard time. I had a real stupid doctor remove the fats from the top and bottom of my eyes. It was horrible. My almond eyes looked so droopy. After that point they decided I needed canthopexy. This left one eye big and the other eye small. Real bad. After many visits to surgeons etc.. I was almost to give up. I analysed my face and realised the issue was more to do with the temples and upper eyelids. I found a PS from Sydney(Australia) I told him of the asymmetries I was not happy with. He totally agreed. He was just honest not like the others, you know the pretend game they play... Anyhow what he did was he closely listened to me and analysed my face while just talking to him of the problems I had. I was blabbing on. He watched carefully and pointed out all the parts I was not happy with, you know the dents, hollows, etc.. He then showed me pics of before and afters. I was so amazed... He showed me hollow upper eyelids and how he fixed them . They looked awesome! So it was my turn and really I was just trying to be positive for the doctors sake of trying to help me, I lost hope. So he injected fillers to my temples and upper eyelids(in the eyebrows). I looked at the mirror & Wallah! it was awesome. I felt so happy. That full look was back and it helped with the asymmetry, almost not so worrying. He kept calling me in for further sessions, to build upon the what he already injected (approx. 6 weeks apart) We wanted to analyse how it looked after the swelling was gone. So we did not inject everything in one go He looked at my older pics and he worked from there. He also injected some along the upper cheeks where it touched the high point of my eyes ( not a lot of PS can't do this, I know this for a fact ) Turned out not much was needed in the lower eye region it was the upper eyelids and the temples. So if you're eyes were almond shaped like mine and it became round after this surgery I highly suggest to inject fillers to the eyebrows and temples to lose the round look. I will recommend DR Steven Liew from Shape Clinic. He's the best. If he reads this I say HELLO:) I only wrote this to help many others with similar problems:) best luck
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Was told Jacono is very aggressive when performing upper and lower blephs. Too late for me though, my lower bleph had too much skin removed and I'm left with drooped eyelids. I have to have canthopexy eye surgery ($19,500) added to the ($17,500) mess he did.
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Go to Australia, there is an occuloplastic surgeon there, Alan McNab. He is in Melbourne. He fixed my eyes and they were a real mess. A flight there and the week long stay plus the surgery would certainly not even amount to half of that.
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Hi ernurse, how long ago did you have blepharoplasty? Are your eyes sunken in their orbits like mine are now...I had traditional blepharoplasty around 9 years ago and my eyes are hollow and sunken in their sockets? How did Dr McNab correct your eyes? What did he do?
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I had mine in 2006. My eyes are not so sunken, my main problem was severely retracted lower eyelids, which made my eyes completely round. I required bilateral hard palate grafts. I also redeveloped entropian which I had before my bleph but my original ps had ignored. I also had some other minor problems, but Dr. McNab managed to give me back some height to my lower lids and returned my eyes to more almond shaped. They are still not ideal as one eye is a slightly different shape, but they are 1000 times better than after my bleph. I also have had some filler (restylane & another softer type the name of which escapes me.) This has helped greatly. The upshot is that what I have now is probably the best I can expect after the botch job by my original surgeon.
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