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31 Yr Old Invisalign Top Ceramic Bottom Jaw Surgery - Montreal, QC

I am at the beginning stages of fixing my teeth. I...

I am at the beginning stages of fixing my teeth. I have crowding and will need orthognatic jaw surgery to correct an underbite. I have started Invisalign (with 6 attachments) for my top teeth (dec 2013) and started ceramic braces for the lower (feb 2014) I also needed three gum grafts to fix receding gums which delayed the lower braces. Then I had my bottom two wisdom teeth removed (feb 2014) I already had my top wisdom teeth removed when I was younger. I am supposed to wear 32 trays of Invisalign (18 months) then will switch to ceramic braces on the top (and bottom) during and 6 months post jaw surgery. I am not a big fan of any of this but must do it. I am glad I wasn't talked into ceramic braces by my orthodontist for the top teeth after seeing my bottom teeth with braces. I'm so far pretty happy with Invisalign. The ceramic braces I definitely prefer over metal ones they are untouchable except for maybe pronouncing a few letters. But wow. Having braces is no cake walk. With food getting stuck in there and flossing, Invisalign you just have to brush your teeth more often and not snack but taking them off makes that pretty quick. I'm not that happy with Invisalign's claim to be invisible. The spit bubbles and attachments are pretty noticeable. But they definitely beat braces. Ceramic or metal. I actually wanted to get lingual braces behind my teeth but my orthodontist who is a lingual provider actually said he wasn't that confident in them, plus they are not a great option during jaw surgery in case a bracket becomes dislodged while your jaw is wired shut. So far I haven't told anyone I have braces, and seemingly nobody has noticed. I've been training myself to not show off my crooked teeth for so many years, so hiding my orthodontics is not much different. I guess that will change once I have ceramic braces on the top. It still seems like a long road ahead but I look forward to having a big confident smile.

7th tray

7th tray of 32 of Invisalign. It seems the most movement is with the back teeth. This tray never gave me the regular pressure and sore teeth other trays have when I first put it in. Visually I still don't notice any difference. The next tray is the 1/4 of the way mark.
I have not had my bottom braces adjusted since being put on in February. One bracket came loose. Got put back on.
My bottom wisdom teeth were pulled last month. Still need a jet to clean out the holes left.
I heard about acceledent on this site. A product that speeds up the time of braces by up to half! And my orthodontist is a supplier. (One of the first in Canada.) I asked him about it. He seems to advocate it. So I'm going for it. For around $1000, less time in braces, why not. 20 minutes a day of sticking some weird vibrating gadget in my mouth. Meh. I can deal with that.
My next appointment is in April, and I should have it by then.
Dr. Paul Korne

Very friendly clinic. Maybe a little too friendly. The clinic is an open concept without walls separating you from other patients and staff. I Thought it was a little strange and that I would prefer to go through this more anonymously but hell we're all on the same boat.

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Comments (8)

I just started my Invisalign too. I got the Acceledent and it's been good so far. I'm surprised that your dentist suggested you to get gum grafts done before the treatment, as your gums will shift along with your teeth during your orthodontic treatment. Sounds like red flags to me.
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Just checking in to see how you're doing :)
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Hello and welcome!  I've already PM'd you, but I want to follow your review so I'm commenting here as well.  

I am extremely interested in the gum grafting procedure, if you could speak a little more to that?  And the state of your teeth that precipitated having this procedure done.

Thank you so much for joining our community!
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If you want to know about gum grafts: The gum graft procedure is not very fun. It was recommended by my orthodontist before the braces could start. It is done in my understanding for one of two reasons: To cover an exposed tooth's root, or in my case because of thin gums. All three of the grafts i had done were around my canines. The two bottom and left top one are quite crooked and actually protrude more than other teeth. Before moving those teeth with braces the orthodontist wanted to make sure there was adequate gum coverage. So I was referred to a periodontist to perform the procedure. What they do (maybe skip down a few lines if you have a weak stomach) is use local anesthetic (freezing) then slice a small piece of tissue from your palette, make a few small incisions to the area receiving the graft, and then stitch the tissue on to that area. They then cover the area and the palette with a putty to protect it. All in about 45 minutes and you're ok to drive after that, Afterwards you can't eat solids for around 3 days, then only soft food until around day 7. Then after a week stitches are removed and a few days after that you are tender, but if you eat carefully you can eat pretty much anything. I had to wait two weeks after that before getting the next procedure done ( they only do one tooth at a time) and go through it all over again, and then again. It is not a very fun experience. You leave there thinking it's not so bad, next stop is the pharmacy, then the freezing wears off. You have to be careful not to touch your palette while brushing, eating, talking cause it hurts. The putty that they put on seemed to stay on the area around the tooth for the week until the stitches are removed, but the putty on your palette pretty much falls off right away or within a day. And that's when the fun begins. Try eating even liquids without it touching your palette. Not easy. And you feel it. Then once it starts getting a little better, you think you can eat boiled vegetables or semi-soft food , but if you don't chew it just right or a piece happens to hit that spot. Ouch. So anything that you can't completely mush up is out. Like meat. That was quite a process to chew. I had ibuprofen triple strength that I took every 4-6 hours. Peridex mouthwash, some Tylenol with codeine, then this viscous liquid that I could apply to the palette ( think had some form of cocaine in it) to numb the palette. That you apply then spit out. The first time was the worst, ( I think the slice in the palette was a little too deep) but each time I had to keep taking Advil every 4-6 hours even through my sleep for about a week. I noticed that acidic foods were more painful. Coffee (even cold) hurt, but I fought through that. I thought bananas would be good, but nope. Acidic? I don't know. Pasta sauce hurt. I thought fruit smoothies would be good, but nope that hurt too. Anything that could not easily be chewed down to a total mush. Like I mentioned meat was dangerous. I had a lot of boost, then I noticed it was more about food you could completely chew up before swallowing. Bread, cake, doughy stuff, ice cream yogurt, boost. Pretty much nothing really nutritious. I'm pretty sure I lost weight and definitely felt run down from not eating well and restless sleeps. But it's only for about 7-8 days. I found the best thing to do was bring a toothbrush and mouthwash with me everywhere for that week, and use it after eating anything, but also when you get any plaque in your mouth. Keep your mouth clean. At night I would wake up in pain. But I found keeping it clean by brushing (gently) and mouthwash was equally as important as any painkiller. I had my wisdom teeth on the bottom removed 6 days ago, but after the grafts that was a breeze. I stopped taking painkillers (I had oxycotone!) for the wisdom teeth after day 2. Mind you I think it was a pretty simple procedure they were completely out and I think came out in one piece. I think. I was pretty out of it when I left that place. I don't mean to scare anybody off of getting it done if you need it done. It's only a week. I took the day off the day of the procedure and was back to work the next, with a few extra bathroom breaks to spit blood and clean my mouth. If I were to do it again I would ask the periodontist or dentist for a little extra putty to take home, or something similar they would recommend to cover the palette area. But it seems pretty hard to get anything to stick to your palette that will actually stay. If you need it done good luck, I'm sure you'll really enjoy that carrot on day 8-9.
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Oh god :(.  I just have some exposed roots--a few--and it's ugly.  But that sounds heinous.  I haven't even managed to get my wisdom teeth extracted yet because I have to go to an oral surgeon (my dentist said they're impacted or something) and I'm afraid.  I managed to go through a full mommy makeover without any trouble, (lots of pain but no fear), but ask me to get wisdom teeth out, forget about it.  And this grafting thing sounds heinous.  I can fast for three days, but a week is more than I can manage, and I can't eat any of the things on the list of stuff you ate.  Like, basically ground-up tofu would be it.  Suckage.

Thanks for the information, though--a lot to think about!

My daughter has a very small lower jaw and a big overbite, so I'm kind of obsessed about orthognathic surgery.  We just have so few people here on RealSelf reviewing about it.  I'm trying to get more people but it is difficult!  
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It's a pain but I wouldn't be that worried it's really not that bad. You can still eat other stuff but carefully. I definitely didn't fast for a week. After 3 days you're onto solid-ish foods again, you just can't exactly savor them. Good luck.
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Hi. I found this info on your gum graft very helpful as I am suppose to have one on my lower tooth. The periodontist wants to do a frenulectomy first which is actually being done on 4/15 and then the graft in two months. You're review only confirmed my fears though...the pain of it all.
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Wow you've certainly got a long road ahead of you. Hope things go well and good luck with the journey. I'm sure it will all be worth it. I'm just waiting on the 3d review which has taken longer due to my dentist not being happy with the movement on the first attempt. I've no idea how many trays or attachments I will need. At the sales pitch it was sold as a 4-6 months treatment but having read all the reviews I suspect it's going to be a lot longer.
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