Ask a doctor

What Type of Anesthesia for Thigh Reduction?

Do I need to go under general anesthesia or can I get local anesthesia for a thigh reduction procedure?

Doctor Answers (11)

The extent of thigh reduction will likely determine type of anesthesia

+4

Thigh reduction can be as focused as just the inner thigh or as extensive as a lower body lift, which addresses the buttock and back of thigh, hips and outer (lateral) thigh, front (anterior) thigh and inner (medial) thigh. Your anatomy and your priorities a s the patient will determine the type of procedure and the type of anesthesia which will allow your surgeon to do the best job for you under the most comfortable circumstance for you.

An inner (medial) thigh lift can be done under a local anesthetic with sedation for small areas of looseness, but I prefer to do this under a general anesthetic. For multiple areas on the thigh, I feel that a general anesthetic is best.

Ann individual consultation and examination with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon with experience in body contouring with both tissue tightening (excision and removal of skin) and liposuction techniques should be your next step. Good Luck!


Ann Arbor Plastic Surgeon

Most commonly general anesthesia

+3

For any extensive surgery on the thighs, general anesthesia would certainly be the most common.

I find that even liposuction or a small amount of skin removal on the medial thighs requires general anesthesia because the area is so sensitive that to keep the patient comfortable, it is best for the patient to go to sleep for the procedure.

Thomas T. Nguyen, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

General anesthesia is safer

+3

General anesthesia is the safest way to go. The main benefit is the protection of the airway and the comfort for both the patient and the surgeon.

If there is a contraindication for general anaesthesia, local anaesthesia with sedation could be used.

Hisham Seify, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Anesthesia for thigh reduction

+2

If you are talking about a thigh lift, that is a BIG operation and needs either general anesthesia or a spinal done by a board certified anesthesiologist.  I also do major liposuction of the thighs under general or spinal.  Minor liposuction like saddlebags or medial knees can be done with local and sedation but I always have an anesthesiologist in attendance to make sure the patient is comfortable and safe.

Lisa Lynn Sowder, M.D.

Lisa L. Sowder, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Thigh Lift

+2

You will need a general anesthesia for thigh lift, thigh reduction or thigh liposuction.  All of these procedures are rather complex and painful.  General anesthesia will make the procedure less painful for you and thus for the surgeon.

Siamak Agha, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Discuss this with your doctor

+2

I do this procdure under general anesthesia. There are other ways to do the procedure like IV sedation, spinal anesthesia and local. Your doctor and you need to discuss the best way for you. Surgical plan and anesthesia depend on many factors including your doctors experience,your health,amount tissue to be removed and the procedure.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Many anesthesia options for thigh reduction

+2

I am not quite sure what you mean by thigh reduction: liposuction or dermolipectomy procedure?

Anesthesia can be delivered in many forms: local, local with oral sedation, local with IV sedation (IV consed), regional anesthesia (blocks), Monitored anesthesia care (MAC), General anesthesia. It can be delivered by the surgeon, nurse, PA, CRNA, or anesthesiologist.

If you are undergoing liposuction, local anesthesia is a possiblity.

However, if you are undergoing a dermolipectomy (thigh lift) of any significant degree, you will likely require a regional (block) or general anesthetic in most cases.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

General anesthesia most common

+1
A thigh lift is generally performed under general anesthesia. However, if the correction is minor another type of anesthesia may be used instead.

Jerome Edelstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 74 reviews

Thigh Reduction is Usually Performed Under General Anesthesia

+1

                  In the vast majority of patients, thigh reduction surgery is performed under general anesthesia.  This approach offers several advantages compared to other methods of anesthesia.  The procedure is more comfortable for the patient and avoids break through pain which can occasionally occur with local anesthesia.  When general anesthesia is utilized, procedures can be more extensive and this can potentially improve the surgical result.

                  Rarely, local anesthesia with I.V. sedation is indicated for patients undergoing thigh lift surgery.  The need for local anesthesia with I.V. sedation may be related to a variety of factors including co-existing health issues. 

                  It’s important to realize that all surgical procedures and anesthetic techniques have risks.  This is true whether local anesthesia or general anesthesia are utilized.  Most surgeons who perform thigh lift surgery agree that the anesthetic techniques utilized is less important than the use of a certified operating room and the presence of an anesthesiologist.  In other words you don’t want your surgeon to be your anesthesiologist.  

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Lower body lift, thigh lift and anesthesia

+1

General anesthesia is a requirement when I perform thigh lift surgery.  Any lesser anesthesia does not provide adequate analgesia for patients undergoing the procedure.

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.