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Can I Still Move my Forehead After Botox?

I am self-conscious of the lines on my forehead and am desperately looking for a way to reduce them however I am a 29 year old actress and am cautious of using botox. Is it possible to get such a treatment where the muscles are weakened but not totally paralysed so expressions are still possible?

Doctor Answers (21)

Forehead Movement After Botox

+1

Most physicians would never inject the amount of Botox it would take to completely "freeze" your forehead muscles, making expressions look different. Instead, your doctor will inject in precise locations to target the muscle and relax it, without making you unable to express yourself through facial movements. If you make sure to express these concerns to your physician, they will have a good idea of your expectations and you'll be satisfied with the outcome. At such a young age, you'll do very well with even just a small amount of product. Thousands of actors and actresses have Botox and you'd never notice it. Best of luck! 


New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Subtle and Aesthetic Botox Treatment of the Forehead for Actors

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Absolutely! Many of my patients in NYC are on stage, in film, or on TV.  Many others who are not actors, do not want to look plastic or like they are wearing a mask.   Botox can and should be used to provide a natural but relaxed appearance.  Forehead lines can be treated unless there is already a significant sagging of the forehead from the aging process. If Botox were used when the forehead were dropping then the relaxed forehead would not be able to help lift up the forehead and the eyebrows and eyelids can droop. This would be terrible for an actor. Low dose units spaced apart and not throughout the forehead is the goal.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Maintaining forehead movement with Botox

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If the treatment is done appropriately, one can still have facial expression while maintaining a relatively smooth forehead.  It is best to start conservatively with the amount of neuromodulator used, as more can always be added.

Sabrina Fabi, MD
San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

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You should not be frozen after getting Botox in the forehead

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Every face is different, as are everyone's goals, but a Botox treatment on the forehead should be able to relax forehead lines without completely freezing your face.  My goal with most patients is to smooth/soften the problematic lines, but allow them to move their eyebrows up and down several millimeters - just not enough to make creases in their skin.

 

I would recommend finding an experienced physician you trust, and starting slowly. 

Richie L. Lin, MD
Summit Dermatologic Surgeon

Forehead movement after botox

+1

Usually, there is some movement after treatment of the forehead with botox.  The injections are typically customized to each patient.  

David A. Lickstein, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Getting subtle results with botulinum toxin

+1

Absolutely, it is possible to have botulinum toxin and still move your forehead!

The dose and site of injections is customised to each patient. If I were treating you I would assess which lines are problematic for you, which would allow me to work out where to put the injections. Then we would discuss what degree of softening you are after, and start with a low dose. I'd ask you to come back in 2 weeks after the initial injections so we could both assess whether you were happy with the result. If you felt the results were too subtle I'd recommend a top-up at the 2 week visit. If you were delighted with the result you wouldn't need a top-up. In the unlikely event that you felt the results were too much we'd know that the initial dose was too high and it would take a couple of months before the effect wore off.

I recommend starting with a low dose, because it can always be topped up. After 1-3 treatments it's generally possible to predict what dose is "right" for you, so you won't usually need the 2 week review.

Jill Tomlinson, MBBS, FRACS
Melbourne Plastic Surgeon

Botox for natural movement with less wrinkles

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The first time Botox is used cosmetically, it should be placed using cautious dosing to ensure natural results.  Although a few patients want to completely eradicate wrinkles, most people want to look naturally more youthful. Properly placed and dosed Botox will elevate the brows slightly and reduce the degree of movement associated with frowning muscles by weakening the muscle. This effect is dose dependent and also dependent on a patient's muscle mass in the treated muscle. 

Michael Howard Swann, MD
Springfield Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Movement in the Forehead after botox

+1

You will be able to move your forehead muscles if the treatment was done properly and not overdone. Natural movement should not be lost due to the treatment.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Can I Still Move my Forehead After Botox?

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 Of course, if the Botox is used appropriately and not over done.  There's no inherent magic in Botox or any filler.  The magic comes in the MD's understanding and ability to follow the proper aesthetics of facial beauty for the creation of a naturally, more attractive face...not a smooth, frozen one.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Moving Forehead after Botox

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We all know A-List actresses who cannot move their foreheads but most of us, including myself, want to limit undesirable movements while maintaining natural facial expression. Properly administered Botox will allow normal facial animation.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.