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Is There Any Way to Repair a Thin Section in a Stretched Earlobe?

My right ear piercing was always a bit lower than my left. After stretching my ears, the bottom of my right lobe has become exceedingly thin (to the point of discomfort). I was wondering if it is possible to move the hole vertically, and use skin removed from above the hole (to move it up to match the left) to thicken the bottom of the earlobe? Essentially, I have no interest in having my stretched piercings sewn closed, I only want to fix the right one that's thin.

Doctor Answers 14

Earlobe repair

Thanks for asking. Earlobes requiring repair can be from a variety of reasons. For example, a torn earlobe from a pulled earring, gauged earlobes that are now unwanted, facelift surgery causing pulled earlobes, or just simply elongated from older age.

Because of the variety of different causes, earlobe repair may vary in complexity. Prices will vary accordingly. and also vary depending on the region of the country you are in and the surgeon's expertise.

Typically to reduce an earlobe, a triangle wedge of earlobe is excised and then carefully sutured together. I have some special techniques that I employ to minimize scarring and notching that can be seen if not reconstructed properly.

This repair can be performed comfortably under local anesthesia and earlobes can be re-pierced 6 weeks later if desired. Consult with an experienced board certified facial plastic / plastic surgeon in you area.

Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

1401 Avocado Avenue
Newport Beach, CA 92660

Is There Any Way to Repair a Thin Section in a Stretched Earlobe?

There are different ways to repair earlobes and only a full examination would allow a complete answer to this question.  Most often, removal of the tissue, often with the whole piercing, and re-piercing at a different time will lead to the best long term results.
Garrett A. Wirth, MD, MS, FACS

Garrett A. Wirth, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

400 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

Repair of earlobe tears and stretched earlobes with plastic surgery

The best solution for the stretched earlobe piercings is to revise the hole and repierce the earlobe at a later period.  I perform these surgeries routinely in my plastic surgery practice. 

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 70 reviews

804 7th Street
Santa Monica, CA 90403

Thin earlobe repair

The best way to fix a thinning earlobe is to excise the area, including the non-offending hole and repair it using lap joint flaps. Although you do perceive the piercing as a problem, repair will be complicated by leaving the hole as is. About eight weeks later, the ear can be repierced. In some circumstances, filler can be injected to plump up the earlobe.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

112-03 Queens Blvd
Forest Hills, NY 11375

Non-surgical technique for Treating Thin Earlobes

There is a non-surgical technique for plumping up thin earlobes.  

Juvederm can be injected and will fill and plump up the thinned earlobe without need for stitches.  

Whole straight forward, a disadvantage of the Juvederm procedure is that it is temporary and last as long as the Juvederm which is 6 to 8 months.

Fredrick A. Valauri, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon

47 East 77th Street
New York, NY 10021

Streched earlobes and thinning skin can be repaired with Earlobe Plastic Surgery

Stretched earlobes and thinning skin can be repaired with Earlobe Plastic Surgery. With an earlobe hole that is moved lower from stretching, the best way to repair this is by excising and then closing it following this with another piercing.  Otherwise to move it upward will require some type of incising and closing.  Without fully closing it, you will need to do some flaps that could be more complicated than just closing it completely.  
Thanks for reading, Dr Young

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

1810 116th Ave. NE
Bellevue, WA 98004

Stretched earlobe hole repair

Depending on how thick the isthmus of skin, the thin parts of a stretched earlobe hole may have to be removed when the edges of an earlobe hole are trimmed and freshened during a repair.  The split or hole in the lobule has to be sutured to recreate the whole lobule anew.  Sometimes, the closure involves some tissue rearrangment to contour the lobule nicely.  Subsequently, you can repierce your ear after swelling decreases 2-3 months afterward. 

Thomas T. Le, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

4785 Dorsey Hall Drive
Ellicott City, MD 21042

Can stretched earlobe holes be repaired?

Depending on the size of the hole and the strength or thickness of the surrounding earlobe tissue, an overly stretched earlobe pierce hole can be either closed or made smaller.  Either procedure takes approximately 30 minutes under local anesthesia.

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

2581 Samaritan Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Earlobe can be repaired

The stretching and thinning of the lobe is a common procedure to fix. You need to cut around the edge and fix the split then repeat the piercing about three months after the repair. In thinning only cases a filler can often be used to plump the lobe. Best regards!

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 169 reviews

360 San Miguel Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

Earlobe concern

This type of earlobe thinning can be addressed with a preocedure under local anesthesia, typically to remove or re-shape that portion of the earlobe.  It will probably require that a new piercing be placed adjacent (but not too close) to the prior piercing.

Jeff Scott, MD
Everett Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

12800 Bothell-Everett Hwy
Everett, WA 98208-6629

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.