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is it possible/realistic to make a long and narrow nose shorter without making it wider with a rhinoplasty?

I like how narrow my nose is, but I hate how long it is and how far it protrudes. I know that rhinoplasty surgery mostly realigns the nose rather than making it smaller, so it seems that if you're making the nose shorter and less protruding, it would have to become wider. But I've seen many pictures in plastic surgeon's rhinoplasty galleries of narrow noses that seem smaller but still just as narrow afterwards. so I was wondering how realistic it would be to expect similar results? Thank you.

Doctor Answers (9)

Shorter Nose Without Increased Width

+1

Having done this work for over 35 years I can assure you that many noses can be made shorter without increasing the width. However, I can also assure you that I have never seen two noses exactly the same during that same time. You need to contact an experienced surgeon who can evaluate your nose discuss your goals.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Making a long and narrow nose shorter while keeping it narrow

+1

The short answer to your questions is yes, but it would be most helpful if your nose could be examined in person. As mentioned in the other posts, numerous nuances require consideration in rhinoplasty and it is possible that in your particular case slight widening would be advisable / required to maintain a long-term patent airway.

Grigoriy Mashkevich, MD

New York Facial Plastic Surgeon

Grigoriy Mashkevich, MD
Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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Rhinoplasty candidate for shorter nose

+1

While it is possible to make a long nose short( de- project) it's also important to make sure the nose balances with itself and your facial features. To narrow the base of the nose, this is accomplished with osteotomies of the nasal bones and tip suturing techniques to the lower lateral cartilages of the nasal tip area. For examples of how we have addressed overly projecting and long noses, please see the link below to our rhinoplasty photo gallery

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Wider?

+1

A well done rhinoplasty will not make the nose wider -- unless you like it that way. It is designed to make it narrower and smaller, and it should fit your face.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Noses can be made smaller as well as narrower by rhinoplasty

+1

Sometimes noses appear wider after removing a large hump. These noses aren't really wider, it is an optical illusion that a smaller hump can appear wider from changes in the shadowing. Even the eyes may appear wider apart.

Contrast this to adding a graft to raise the bridge in very flat noses. When patients have very short nasal bones, moving them through osteotomy (breaking the bones) doesn't narrow them very much. But, raising the bridge makes the nose appear narrower and the eyes closer together.

Steven J. Pearlman, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Rhinoplasty dos and donts

+1

hi AJ,

Rhinoplasty can certainly accomplish the changes you are looking for within reason. It depends on all the changes you are looking to accomplish though. If you go for a consultation it will help to clear things up.

Taller noses are narrower than flatter ones. That's true. However if you want a nose that's not so flat, the chances of being narrow afterwards goes up.

Smaller noses don't breathe better. There's less space inside when the outside is made smaller. You can, however improve breathing if a turbinate reduction and septoplasty are performed. Again, if you don't make a nose too small that will work.

You can't narrow a nose without osteotomies or bone breaks unless you augment the height with an implant. If you don't need an implant and you don't want osteotomies you can't be narrowed in the upper nose.

There are many other nuance issues such as these. That's why it's such a complicated surgery and that's why you need to work with someone focused on nasal surgery in order to get the most out of the surgery. Hope this information helps.

Best of luck.

Richard W. Westreich, MD
Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Shortening a nose without making it wider?

+1

An artistically performed rhinoplasty can modify the size as well as the shape of the nose in a variety of ways to produce an improved cosmetic result depending on desired outcome, individual anatomy and surgical expertise.

Keep in mind that following the advice from a surgeon on this or any other website who proposes to tell you what to do without examining you, physically feeling the tissue, assessing your desired outcome, taking a full medical history, and discussing the pros and cons of each operative procedure would not be in your best interest. I would suggest
you find a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) or facial plastic surgeon (otolaryngologist) that you trust and are comfortable with. You
should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

Robert Singer, MD FACS

La Jolla, California

Robert Singer, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Is it possible/realistic to make a long and narrow nose shorter without making it wider with a rhinoplasty?

+1

You can achieve a natural result with a refined tip while deprojecting the nose.

Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of rhinoplasties and rhinoplasty revisions each year. Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 238 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.