Lower Facelift or Veneers for Nasolabial Folds?

I am thinking of getting a lower face lift and porcelain veneers. I have some nasolabial folds and mild sagging of jowls. I am told that veneers can help with the nasolabial folds. Should I get the the lift first or the veneers first?

Doctor Answers (3)

Veneers may dazzle others so no one sees your nasolabial folds

+3

Dental veneers should have little effect on nasolabial folds. They certainly can make your mouth look better and may distract from other areas, but to treat nasolabial folds, you might require fillers or surgery. When treating nasolabial folds, I commonly place filler above and below them to make cheeks look more rounded and youthful. In actuality, facelifts are great for jowls and the neck but may have little effect on nasolabial folds.


New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Veneers for nasolablial folds

+2

 It would be very surprising to me that veneers could have any significant effect on nasolabial folds.  Fillers and facelifts are far more effective in minimizing these lines.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

Veneers would have a minor effect

+2

Depending on the severity of the Nasolabial folds, you shouldn't expect a drastic change with veneers. While veneers can have amazing effects, the soft tissue effects are more noticeable around the lips (slightly fuller, reduction in creases). Even then they should be minor.

To have a truly drastic change would require the veneers to be very thick. When people get a set of dentures the folds can be affected, as the material can extend up towards the nose.

Do the Facelift first, and perhaps dermal fillers. Once that is done, veneers would complete the makeover for a fantastic new you!

Lance Timmerman, DMD
Seattle Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.