How Long Until I Can Exercise After a Breast Lift with Augmentation?

Doctor Answers (10)

Wait 3 weeks before vigorous exercise after breast augmentation and breast lift

+2

Thank you for your question. Of course you must follow the instructions of the plastic surgeon who performed your surgery.

In my practice I asked patients to wait on average 3 weeks after combination breast augmentation and breast lift before they start vigorous exercise. It is important that the skin incisions on the breast are dry, pink and appropriately healed for 3 weeks before stressing the incision. It is also important to wear a support bra during any exercise activity.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Exercise After a Breast Lift with Augmentation

+1

Every surgeon has their own recommendations on this topic.  For my patients, as they start to feel better (within the first two to seven days), they may increase their level of activity, such as walking around the mall or going to the office to do desk work. At four weeks, they can begin light, non-impact cardio exercise, such a recumbent (sitting back) bicycle or an elliptical. At five to six weeks after surgery they will be released to ease back into full exercise activity. The internal healing process takes longer than you think, so it is important that you return to your regular exercise routine slowly and carefully. When you resume an exercise you have not done in a while, try it in a small dose and see how you feel the next day. If you are sore, you probably pushed yourself too hard. Let your body be your guide to what is the right amount of exercise. Running and high impact exercises are the hardest on your body and you may need to put these off for a couple of months (i.e. an elliptical machine is better than jogging on a treadmill). For breast augmentation patients, it is also better to avoid or minimize pushups and bench press exercises after surgery (long-term) because these can distort the appearance of your implants and stretch out the breast pockets over time.

Robert Cohen, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

How Long Until I Can Exercise After a Breast Lift with Augmentation?

+1

Every surgeon has their own set of guidelines on this topic. For my patients  early on I worry about bleeding and incisions opening up because of too much vigorous exercise. It takes incisions 6 weeks to gain their maximal strength back so stressing them before that time with strenuous exercise can lead to opening of the incisions. The capsule around the implant takes about 3 months to form from the day of augmentation. I do not allow any strenuous exercise for 6 weeks. No jogging or anything that would cause the breasts to bounce. No heavy lifting for 6 weeks and no pectoralis exercises minimum 3 months an preferably for life. The action of the pectoralis muscle will slowly force your implant towards the armpit and widen the breast pocket causing malposition of the implant. These are my guidelines so make sure you ask your surgeon what they prefer.

Richard J. Brown, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

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Exercise after a breast augmentation

+1

I usually have my breast augmentation patients start light exercise after 1 week and intense workouts at 6 weeks.

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Exercise after breast lift and augmentation

+1

I generally advise no heavy lifting or strenuous activity (ie working out) for 4 weeks after a breast augmentation and lift procedure.  However, your PS is the best person to advise you on activity after your procedure as he/she knows exactly what was done.  Essentially, you need to give time for all your incisions to heal.  Best of luck.

Dr. Basu

Houston, TX

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 117 reviews

Hello

+1

 

 

After surgery we like to tell our patients to wait 6-8 weeks to start exercising your upper body. You can start doing lower body after 3 weeks. Each practice is different make sure you see your PS to see what he is recommending.

 

Stuart B. Kincaid, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Exercise After Augmentation

+1

  

      I recommend that my patients begin slowly, and then increase gradually over a month.  Begin with low demand exercises such as walking or slow stationary bicycle. By two to three weeks can advance to elliptical training.  If it is painful or doesnt feel right, then back off.

 

 

Clifford King, MD
Middleton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Exercising after lift and BA

+1

You really need to follow the instructions by your own surgeon. There are many different opinions by different surgeons. The one that counts is your surgeon's.

Ronald Schuster, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Exercise after Breast Augmentation/Lifting?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Your plastic surgeon will be in the best position to advise  advise you regarding postoperative activities;  much will depend on how well you do and whether you experience any complications or not.   Lower body exercises can be resumed relatively quickly after surgery. Generally, heavy exercise/lifting will need to wait 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively.

 

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 719 reviews

How Long Until I Can Exercise After a Breast Lift with Augmentation?

+1

That's a question your surgeon can best answer. A lot depends on the precise operation that was done. And it depends upon what type of exercise you are considering.

 

I let my patients walk as much as they wish beginning the day of surgery. Non-chest work outs can start at a week, light chest work at two weeks, and back to normal by four weeks, provided wound healing is progressing normally.

 

(I know that many of my patients do much more than I have cautioned, and , I believe, without bad consequence.)

Thanks, best wishes.

 

 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.