Anti-Viral Medication Before Laser Surgery

How many days prior laser surgery is it a good idea to take an anti-viral? Do I need to take one if I am only getting laser on my upper chest area?

Doctor Answers (10)

Begin Antiviral medication 1- 2 days prior to treatment

+1

Antiviral medications should be started 1-2 days prior to resurfacing treatments.  The medication should be continues until full re-epithelialization or healing has occurred.  Until the skin is fully healed you are still at risk for an outbreak.

 


Palo Alto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Laser surgery and anti-viral medication

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If you have not had cold sores on your chest or your close contacts do not have a history of cold sores, it is not necessary to take an anti-viral medication before a non-ablative laser procedure.  If you have a history of cold sores in any area and are having an ablative procedure, you should start the anti-viral medication 24 hours before your procedure and continue for 7 days.

Martie Gidon, MD, FRCPC
Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Laser Surgery

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We usually have them start 24-48 hours before, depending on their location of procedure.  On the face, 48 hours, on the body, 24 hours. Thank you for your question and good luck.

Vivek Bansal, MD
Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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Antiviral therapy may be taken 12 hours before laser surgery

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Antiviral therapy may be taken 12 hours before laser surgery. This is usually done for laser treatments of the face and not the chest.

Edward Lack, MD
Chicago Dermatologist
3.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Antivirals prior to laser treatment

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Antiviral treatment is reasonable to consider when there are any treatments near an area which occasionally gets cold sores (e.g. around the lips). If treating the chest, taking an antiviral is NOT necessary.

Benjamin Barankin, MD
Toronto Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Anti virals and laser surgery

+1

For me it depends on the type of procedure: If I am using a fractionated laser and patients don't have a history of cold sores I don't put them on any antivirals. You heal the surface of the skin so quickly with antivirals I don't find it necessary. If you have a history or if I use full ablative treatments I will start them that morning.

Jeffrey Kenkel, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Fractionated laser treatments

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In general for my patients I recommend antiviral medications before a laser facial resurfacing or fractionalted laser procedure, starting 24 hours prior to the procedure.  For a procedure on the chest unless there is a history of prior viral infections in the area or another outstanding medical problem I do not routinely use antiviral medciation.

Paul Carniol, MD
Summit Facial Plastic Surgeon

Anti-viral medications befoe laser surgery

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If you have a history of  herpes breakouts around the mouth or for that matter if you had chicken pox as a child it is a good idea to take anti-viral medications around your laser treatment to prevent an outbreak. I generally prescribe 1 day before and 5 days after with Zovirax.

Richard Galitz, MD, FACS
Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Anti-viral and lasers

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This question really depends upon the laser and area treated. In general, if it is a facial ablative laser, I recommend anti-virals to start the day before the procedure.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Anti-virals are used to pre-treart patients undoing laser resurfacing around the mouth inparticular.

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I don't  treat my patients who are having their chests lasered with anti-virals unless they have a history of herpes on their chest which is very rare.  The most common places for the herpes virus is in cold sores around the mouth or nose, therefore when treating these areas we pre-treat  at my office one day before and for 5-7 dyas depending on the laser used.

Good Luck.

Dr. Sikorski

Lenore Sikorski, MD
Orange County Dermatologist
4.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.