Ask a doctor

How Much Downtime Should I Expect After Rhinoplasty Surgery?

I am a professional model and obvously would like to know how much time it is going to take to heal before i can go back to work?

Doctor Answers (11)

Body or Face?

+4

If you model for body shots, then one month is fine. If you are a face model, then 2 months are more appropriate. It will take a year or more to achieve the final results, but people should not be able to see that you had something done (unless you are radically changing your look) at those time points and distances.


Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Camera readiness after rhinoplasty

+2

I have dealt with this issue many times as a Beverly Hills Rhinoplasty specialist. I can tell you that everyone is different and your healing will depend on your particular nose and what exactly needs to be done depending on what your desires are.

Following finesse rhinoplasty (which means minor changes) people are usually ready to be on stage or on camera after about 10 days to 2 weeks with make up. The good news for you is that most people who are making a living with their looks like models and actors already have fairly nice noses and only need minor changes and therefore require finesse rhinoplasties.

The more work that needs to be done, the more potential swelling you will have and the longer it will take you to be camera ready. In general models and actors do not fall into this category, but that is not an absolute rule. I usually tell people to wait at least 6 weeks (if not longer) to get new head shots. Hope this helps.

Jason B. Diamond, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Downtime During Rhinoplasty Recovery

+2

The "downtime" following rhinoplasty is variable depending on what rhinoplasty techniques are used such as whether the surgery was performed open or closed, whether any tip work was performed, and whether the nasal bones were broken (osteotomies). Patients who undergo open rhinoplasty typically have more edema (swelling) that persists longer compared to patients in whom closed rhinoplasty techniques were used. If the nose was surgically broken by performing osteotomies then there is usually more swelling and bruising.

Patients are generally encouraged to take a week of from work or school. After two weeks, most patients can gradually return to strenuous activities such as exercising.

The swelling gradually dissipates over the first several months and thus the appearance of the nose changes gradually. When the cast is removed after one week, the nose will look swollen. Usually by the end of the second week, the swelling and bruising have subsided enough that the casual observer will not readily notice that the nose has been operated on. However, to the patient, the nose will look swollen or "puffy" for several months. By about 3-4 months, the majority of the swelling will be gone but will look larger in photographs. It can take as long as a year for the final shape to become apparent. You should give yourself several months if if there are any work or social engagements that would cause concern.

C. Spencer Cochran, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

You might also like...

Patients undergoing a rhinoplasty will have a nasal...

+2

Patients undergoing a rhinoplasty will have a nasal splint for about a week.

If an open rhinoplsasty is performed (that is using a small incision on the skin between the nostrils on the area called the columella), the sutures would be removed 1 week after surgery. The majority of the swelling and bruising should go away within 2 weeks.

Because you are a model, I would probably give it a month to go back to photo shoots. There will be some residual swelling in the tip of the nose for months, but only you would probably notice it.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Downtime after rhinoplasty

+1
Recovery after rhinoplasty will vary based on the person, characteristics of the nasal tissues and what was done during surgery. The amount of downtime varies greatly as well.

Return to work and social activities varies greatly based on the person. Patients tend to feel well within a few days after rhinoplasty although they have the splints in place, may have some swelling, and feel congested. There does not tend to be a lot of pain following rhinoplasty so most patients are able to do light activities like reading, typing, walking, etc. Depending on what was done during surgeries, patients may need to avoid the use of glasses for 4-6 weeks to allow adequate healing to take place. Additionally, some surgeons may have preference for avoiding certain foods, blowing the nose, etc. Typically, somewhere between 4-6 weeks, you can return to strenuous activities including exercise. You should clarify with your surgeon what restrictions you have and when you can return to normal and strenuous activities.

Jamil Ahmad, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Like all things, it depends...

+1

This discussion can really only be answered after an examination and discussion of what your goals are surgically.  The thickness of your skin, the approach used during surgery and the maneuvers used will all influence how long you will need to be out following surgery.
 

Colin Pero, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Rhinoplasty usually has a one week downtime

+1

After Rhinoplasty surgery some patients have some bruising around the eyes that lasts for 5 days. Once the cast is removed at 7 days the nose is usually a little swollen, but it was made smaller during surgery so the net result is that it is not perceived. I have many professional patients that can go back to work after one week without issue.

Andrew Jacono, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

What to expect with a rhinoplasty recovery

+1

I simply tell patients to avoid looking in the mirror for a few days. A lightweight cast is applied to the top of the nose to keep the cartilage and bone in place during healing, and gauze packing is inserted in the nose for one to two days to protect the septum from moving and to minimize bleeding. While I've known patients who have felt perfectly comfortable dining out at restaurants when wearing the cast, most people go into hiding for a few days while the bruising and swelling subside. The post-op feeling is generally not painful, just uncomfortable. You will want to apply ice and elevate the head, and after a week, the cast comes off. Despite the swelling and bruising, the results are immediate.

Michelle Copeland, MD, DMD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

7 to 10 days of downtime after rhinoplasty

+1

Stephen

How quickly you can be camera ready depends on how much is done and how it is done. I find that I usually get public people back in front of the camera within 7 to 10 days. But I will be doing a closed rhinoplasty approach. I greatly prefer this method and find the after surgical healing period significantly reduced. This approach is usually much less traumatic and invasive and more likely keeps the nose appearing within the context of ones face but just better. And my patients are very appreciative of the quicker recovery. If someone need a major reconstruction and an open approach then the recovery period in order to be camera ready may be 2 to 6 weeks.

I hope this helps

Good luck

Steven H. Dayan, MD
Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Two weeks should be enough time to get back in front of a camera

+1

In our practice we usually recommend that our patients allow two full weeks before getting back on television or in front of any camera after a cosmetic rhinoplasty.  That should be plenty of time for most people!

S. Randolph Waldman, MD
Lexington Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.