Should I go for CO2 Fractional Laser treatment or excision of my facial moles? (photo)

I have several moles on my face/neck that I would like removed for cosmetic purposes. Some have grown slowly over many years, and some have appeared in just the last few years. All grow longer hairs, and all but one are dark in color. My main concern is for minimal scarring and that they don't grow back. I am looking into CO2 Fractional Laser removal in Thailand because it's quick and cost-effective, and this is what the best Thai cosmetic clinics recommend.

Doctor Answers (2)

Mole on face removal with possible laser resurfacing of the scars later

+1
Dear Inquiring
  • Thanks for the question- when it comes to Fractionated laser treatments 
    • these work well for scars that are not the same height
    • laser resurfacing is good for pigmented skin changes from aging and mild wrinkles
    • it is not the best first treatment for moles that are raised 
    • Hopefully your treatment out of the country will go smoothly, consider that you may have complications and will need to find doctors for followup. 
    • Consider surgical excision and then leave laser resurfacing for later in the healing process
    • Best Wishes


Sacramento Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Excision vs laser mole removal

+1
I feel that it is never appropriate to use a laser as your primary treatment for removing a mole. Regardless of how "benign" a mole may appear, a biopsy may still reveal it to be atypical. There are many ways to surgically remove a mole with a minimal scar and have tissue to send for microscopic examination which is the only way to ensure that it was benign. Using a laser to "destroy" a mole will alter its look and make it more difficult to observe for precancerous changes in the future. Plus, I'm not convinced that a laser will even give the best cosmetic result.

Mitchell Schwartz, MD
South Burlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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