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Lower Bleph Scarring, How Can I Improve it? (photo)

Post 30 days upper & lower blephs. Lower bleph scar has separated and widened. Raised nodule scar in outer corner of both eyes. Two distinct pimple looking growths on lower scar not resolving. How long do I need to wait for scar revision? What can I use now to improve the scarring? Do I need to get a 2nd opinion? My PS said he can fix it, but why wasn't it done correctly the first time? Would I need to undergo another surgery with anesthesia? Can you recommend an ASPS in Sarasota, FL?

Doctor Answers (11)

Scarring after lower blepharoplasty

+2

Scarring is different in each person; some people are genetically prone to form worse scars than others. As well, delayed healing or infection are factors that contribute to scars being more prominent.  It's hard to tell what the pimple-like growths are as there is no close-up photo. However, these could be a reaction to a suture material; if your surgeon used any dissolving sutures this could be the cause. All scars continue to improve for one year as they mature. There are things that can be done at the 30 day mark that can help your scar settle faster. Regular massage is important with moisturiser or vitamin E or silicon gel (at least twice a day and firmly over the areas that are lumpy). Laser can also improve the pink colour. Your eyelid position is good, the surgery was done correctly. I would be patient and let your scar settle, it is very likely to improve in this area with time. 


Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Revision lower blepharoplasty can work.

+2

Hi.

1)  The 'pimples" are probably little cysts that can be unroofed anytime.

2)  For the rest, I would leave things alone for four or five months, and then see an oculoplastic surgeon.  I think you will need a revision, and it may not be easy.  Sorry about my not optimistic opinion!

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Lower lid scars after blepharoplasty almost never need a revision.

+1

The photograph demonstrates lower lid incision is still actively healing. There's no specific treatment except leaving it alone. Over time the author very much in your favor that it will become close to invisible.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Wait For Scar Revision

+1
While the appearance of your scars is causing you great stress, early revisionary surgery is not recommended. Your scars are inflammed, but are likely to improve significantly with time. The dots may be inclusion cysts which can be treated earlier.  The best course of action is to keep your lines of communication open with your surgeon and continue to share your concerns. Best wishes.

George Bitar, MD
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Eyelid Incision

+1

Your incision looks okay for 30 days.  It will improve with time.  Incisions usually take up to a year to fully mature but eyelid incisions mature sooner than this.  I would give this more time and not consider revision at this time or the near future.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Lower Bleph Scarring, How Can I Improve it? (photo)

+1

Allow 3 months of healing before seeking a secondary operation. I might use massage therapy to help. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Lower blepharoplasty incisions and healing

+1

These incisions look typical of what we see after lower blepharoplasty.  The incisions will change a lot over the next few months.  It is amazing the way these incisions fade in most every patient, but it takes some time.  Keep following with your doctor and be patient.  Sun avoidance is very important.

Matheson A. Harris, MD
Salt Lake City Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Lower Bleph Scarring, How Can I Improve it?

+1

Your incisions are still visible but this is not uncommon at this point. Time is your best friend here. Continue with sun avoidance and follow your doctors recommendations. It is highly likely that this will continue to improve for the first 3-12 months. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Lone Tree Facial Plastic Surgeon

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Be patient

+1

The incision line looks slightly pink as does along the corner of your eye. This is normal for 30 days out and will gradually decrease with time. In my experience, it is also normal to have some hardness develop at the outer corner especially if a suspension suture was placed underneath the skin here. This will gradually soften with time. You should ask your surgeon if he is ok with you gently massaging beneath the eye and at the outer corner. This may help speed up the recovery. Other than that, be patient and return to see your surgeon if there are any concerns with the healing process.

Kristina Tansavatdi, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Eyelid surgery scars

+1

This looks like the normal healing process and should be much better in a few months. If the redness bothers you, a low potency steroid ointment such as FML or lotemax should help. You are always welcome to get another opinion, but I suspect most doctors will tell you to give everything time to heal. Surgical wounds take many months to mature.

Mitesh Kapadia, MD, PhD
Boston Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.