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When can I exfoliate my tummy tuck incision (I will be using natural home products)?

When can I start to exfoliate my incision? Is all healed up but is lumpy on one side due to stretch marks, so I feel unease about starting the exfoliation before it smooths out. Or can I start now since is healed up? Thank you :)

Doctor Answers (7)

Scar care

+2
There is not a distinct answer for when to start home remedies on scars.  I encourage my patients to stick to products that have scientific evidence and are monitored for quality by the FDA.  There are a number of such products that your plastic surgeon should be able to point you towards.
Best,
Dr. Pyle


Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Improve tummy tuck scar

+2
Keep your tummy tuck scar taped for six weeks.
Do not treat it in any way - you body has a pre-set healing process that lasts 6 months.
Exfoliation will not improve the final result and is likely to irritate the scar and skin.
Most tummy tuck scars are excellent. Revision can be done if needed at 6 months or later.

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

When can I exfoliate my tummy tuck incision (I will be using natural home.

+2
Hello, The best suggestion I could give you is to ask your surgeon he or she would give you the best instruction to follow base on your case. 

Mel T. Ortega, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 158 reviews

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Exfoliation on scar

+2
You have to wait about 8 weeks to do something rough on your incision. You may massage it, you may rub it with scar creams or use silicon strips in the mean time.
Time will even out the incision.
Dr. Cardenas

Laura Carmina Cardenas, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

When can I exfoliate my tummy tuck incision?

+1
Hello! Thank you for the question! It is common for scars to fully mature for up to a year. In the meantime, there are a few things that may help to ameliorate your incision/scar. The most proven (as well as cheapest) modality is simple scar massage. Applying pressure and massaging the well-healed scar has been shown to improve the appearance as it breaks up the scar tissue, hopefully producing the finest scar as possible. Other things that have been shown to add some benefit, albeit controversial, are silicone sheets, hydration, and topical steroids. These can usually be started at approximately 3-4 weeks postop and when incisions healed. In addition, avoidance of direct sunlight to the incision will significantly help the appearance as they tend to discolor with UV light during the healing process. Scars will never disappear, but attempt is made to make the finest scar in a concealed location. Incisions may be revised to lower or conceal better if enough laxity exists.

If unsightly scars are still present after approximately a year's time, other things that your surgeon may consider are intralesional steroid injections, laser, or just surgical revision of the scar itself.

Hope that this helps! Best wishes!

Lewis Albert Andres, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Consult your surgeon about exfoliating tummy tuck incision

+1
Thank you for your question.  It is very important that you consult your plastic surgeon before attempting any exfoliation or other treatment of your tummy tuck incision.  Aggressive exfoliation could irritate the scar.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Scar guard rather than exfoliation

+1
I would recommend you begin a scar guard on your incision once it is completely healed and you have approval from your surgeon. Your surgeon may carry a scar guard she/he recommends, or look for a silicone-based treatment.

Renee Burke, MD
Barrington Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.