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Droopy Eyelid when I Smile After Jaw Botox?

When I try to press and raise my upper eye there is like something lose something in my eye separates and the other eye I didn't get botox don't have lose muscle in top of eye when I push up

Doctor Answers (6)

Droopy Eyelid after Botox to Jaw

+1

   Botox would be unlikely to diffuse from the jaw to the upper eyelid to create ptosis.  Is it possible these are not related?


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Botox for the jaw area

+1

It would be unusual for Botox for your jaw area to cause your problem.  You should return to your injector for assessment.

Martie Gidon, MD, FRCPC
Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Droopy Eyelid when I Smile After Jaw Botox?

+1

 Botox injected in the Masseter Muscle should not affect the upper eyelid but if you're concerned call and ask the MD that did your Botox injections.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Botox for the jaw and masseter muscles

+1

It would be very unlikely to have any symptoms around your eye after a botox treatment to the jaw region. The two are likely unrelated.

Jamil Asaria, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Droopy Eye after Botox

+1

Hi Caroline.  If you received Botox to the masseter muscle (jaw), it is unlikely that this would cause any changes in the eye area.  Best bet is to wait 3-4 months and then reevaluate the eyes again as the Botox will have worn off.  This will tell you if the Botox caused any differences.  Good luck.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox and eyes

+1

It is very difficult to answer your question without first seeing you in person. You should consider posting pictures to further assess the situation.

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 130 reviews

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