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Curious About Using Latisse on my Eyebrows. Is It Ok?

My eyebrows are as sparse and light as my eyelashes. I cannot express how much I hate having to practically draw them in daily. Is Latisse an option for this, or do you have any other recommendations?

Doctor Answers (6)

Latisse for eyebrows

+1
Latisse is only FDA approved for the eyelashes, however there are reports that it can achieve an improvement for brows as well.


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 63 reviews

Lastisse works on Eyebrows

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Latisse can grow hair whereever it is placed, including the eyebrows.  I have had patients who've tried to grow in their eyebrows with Latisse (off-label) and some have been successful at doing so.  The others who've tried it have told me the hairs that did grow in were white or too coarse or not of the same quality of hair as their typical eyebrow hair.  Being that Latisse can grow hairs whereever it is placed, we recommend not using too much on the upper eyelashes because we have seen hairs grow beyond the eyelids.

Amir Moradi, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Latisse Works For Eyebrows, Lower Lid Lashes, and Other Areas

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Latisse (bimatoprost) is the only FDA-approved product for promoting the growth of sparse eyelashes. It is manufactured by Allergan and is EXACTLY the same as the Allergan product Lumigan, which is used to treat glaucoma. Although Latisse is currently approved only for use on upper eyelid lashes, it has been shown to help grow lashes on the lower lids as well as the hairs of the eyebrows. Although scalp hair follicles are believed to be less responsive to Latisse, there are anecdotal reports of success in treating some types of bald spots of the scalp with this product.

Latisse is by no means the only product available that contains this class of ingredients. Latanoprost (Xalatan) and travoprost  (Travatan), both of which are FDA-approved at this time only for use in glaucoma, are also available by doctor's prescription. Anectodal reports suggest that Travatan may even be more effective than Latisse for growing eyelash hair.

I have begun combining the application of these products with in-office medical microneedling to promote hair growth in men and women who have not responded sufficiently well to other conventional treatments for male and female pattern hair loss.

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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Latisse for Eyebrows

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Although Latisse is only FDA approved for use on the upper eyelid, it also works on the lower lid and eyebrows, but is considered "off-label" so you won't hear your doctor recommending it in other places too quickly. I have heard of my patients using it in a myriad of spots....and there is even a rumor of one man using it on his bald spot! I don't have any feed back on that, however.

Anthony J. Kameen, MD
Baltimore Ophthalmologist

Latisse works on eyebrows too!

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Latisse grows hair, and it reportedly works on eyebrows also. This is considered an "off label" use which means it has not been tested or approved by the FDA and can only be recommended by an individual doctor for an individual patient. Therefore I can not advise you to use it this way, but in theory it should work so long as their are hair follicles present which can be stimulated. It may darken the skin beneath the eyebrows although this effect should be reversible and may enhance the appearance. Be very careful if used this way not to go beyond the eyebrows.

Again, this is an "off label" usage and you should consult your doctor before trying this method.

Jon Dishler, MD
Denver Ophthalmologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Latisse for Eyebrows

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Latisse does work very well for regrowing eyebrow hairs.  The follicles need to be alive and present even if the area has been overplucked.  Try it!  It should make them longer, thicker and darker. 

Janet M. Neigel, MD
West Orange Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.