Advice for Exercise After Breast Augmentation?

I work out everyday and am getting breast implants ASAP. I know it will be hard to run or do the elliptical, but can I do stationary bike at the gym, since it only involes moving the legs? I heard getting the blood rushing isn't good for healing but I need to stick to my routine and cannot possibly take the 3 weeks off from working out that they say you must do to heal right. Any advice?

Doctor Answers (55)

Listen to your doctors orders!

+6
I understand how frustrating it is for fit, physically active people to take the required time off of their workout routine to heal completely. It really is a challenge for many of my patients. Taking that down time will mean a faster and better recovery and it is a way to avoid complications. Please listen to the advice of your doctor and take it easy. Regular visits with your doctors office are the best way to ensure you know when you can resume certain activities. I have included a link to my before and after gallery that includes many athletes who have elected to have breast augmentation surgery


Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Working out after Breast Augmentation

+5

Recovery from surgery is simple. The body will let you know when it is ready for activity. This is not the time for no pain no gain. Here in Miami I get my share of patients that "need" to work out. My experience has been that after two weeks it should be ok to spin. Maybe not position 3, but one or two will get you all the cardio you need. Any earlier, you can try just walking. The metabolic rate rises when the body undergoes a surgical procedure, so for a few weeks you will burn extra calories, without lifting a finger.

My advice is, try it, and if it hurts don't do it.

Jose M. Soler-Baillo, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Exercise restrictions after breast augmentation in Albany, NY

+4

Thank you for an excellent question. Every woman recovers at their own pace after a breast augmentation. However, there are a few general guidelines that I give to patients.

Following a breast augmentation, I ask that women avoid any strenuous activity for the first two weeks. This means any activity that elevates your heart rate or blood pressure. The reason for this is that elevation of your heart rate or blood pressure can increase the risk of bleeding or swelling.

After 2 weeks, I allow women to resume cardio workouts such as spinning or an elliptical. Full workouts can be resumed after 3 weeks. While it seems like a long time now, the time will go quickly and your body will stay in shape for this short duration.

Best of luck with your breast augmentation.

Jeff Rockmore

Jeffrey Rockmore, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

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Advice for Exercise After Breast Augmentation?

+3

For the first two weeks you should not do anything that will increase your blood pressure and heart rate, so slow walking is allowed. Weeks 2-4 Brisk walking and stationary bike is OK. Weeks 4-6 Light running, After 6 weeks - normal

Naveen Somia, MBBS, PhD, FRACS
Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Exercise after breast augmentation

+3

This is an excellent question, especially if you are a very active individual. Physical activity is crucial for your well being, recovery and I encourage you to stay active. The only caveat is that for the three weeks after your augmentation I would recommend to be very careful and avoid your upper body workouts. Try your best not to activate your pecs. The implants are partially under your pecs and therefore you should allow that area to heal for three weeks. You made an investment to enhance your figure so a little sacrifice will not harm your overall fitness. I think lower body workouts should be okay in the meantime. I would start with just a simple walk, and read the messages that your body is sending you. Adjust your intensity depending on the way you feel. When you start up again with the upper body in three weeks remember to reduce the intensity and build back up as tolerated. Your body will not mislead you, so listen to it.  Good luck.

 

Rami Ghurani, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Advice for Exercise after Breast Augmentation...

+3

I allow my patients to use a stationary bike starting 2 weeks after breast augmentation surgery. I prefer that you do not do high impact activity for 4-6 weeks from your date of surgery. Listen to your body and know your limits. The more time you take to recuperate, the better your results! Good Luck with your surgery.

Robert Heck, MD
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Best healing after breast augmentation

+2
I have found the most attractive breast augmentation results are seen in women that have stopped working out completely for at least 4 weeks after surgery. Many patients have told us the exact same thing as you have, but when fully healed say, "it was worth it". This advice has worked best for our competitive athletes, as well as non-professional athletes that usually work out every day.
It is important.

George John Alexander, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

At 6 Weeks Following Breast Augmentation, Most Patients Are Back To Normal Activity, Including Light Exercising

+2

Recovery times following breast augmentation surgery vary from patient to patient. These times are significantly impacted by the nature of the procedure, the patient’s employment, and the patient’s social situation. It’s important to realize that even though breast augmentation is a cosmetic procedure, it’s still a significant operation with associated risk. For this reason, premature return to normal activity can result in an increased incidence of complications.

We generally recommend light activity for the first week following the procedure. After one week, patients are allowed to gradually resume normal non strenuous activities. Strenuous activities and heavy lifting are not allowed for at least six weeks in most cases. At six weeks, most patients are able to resume all of their normal activities.

It’s important to remember that every patient is unique. The specifics of their employment, exercise routine and surgical procedure will have a significant impact upon their recovery. Make sure you discuss this issue with your surgeon. Your surgeon’s insights, regarding your procedure, will provide important information regarding when you can resume your exercise routine. Your breast augmentation represents a significant investment. The best way to protect that investment is to follow your surgeon’s post operative instructions.

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 73 reviews

Exercise After Breast Aug

+2

I highly recommend you listen to the advice of your surgeon, but with standard breast augmentation patients in my practice, they may resume exercise at 2 weeks post procedure.  At this point, you should start to GRADUALLY resume exercise so as not to overdo it.  You want to make sure you are tolerating the exercise well before you continue to increase it.  I would definitely encourage you to start slow and to avoid exercises that focus on your upper body until you are 3 weeks post.

Jeffrey W. Hall, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Exercise After Augmentation

+2

The best answer is to do what your surgeon recommends.  They know what they have done in terms of specific surgical procedures, and are the best ones to recommend when you can get back to using a stationary bike.

Personally, I allow my BBA patients to begin low impact exercise after 2-3 weeks.  I encourage them to avoid high impact workouts for 6 weeks.  Everyone has their own voodoo - you should follow that prescribed by your operating surgeon.

 

Sincerely,

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.