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How Many V Beam Treatments Needed for Broken/dilated Capillaries?

I have a few on my nose and they are actually very light and hard to notice in indoor lighting. It is mostly seen as a general redness in the area but if you look closely you can see really tiny veins. There is a few darker veins, and one obvious looking cluster, but overall its not too bad. How many treatments are needed? And what are the side effects/risks for someone with fair asian skin?

Doctor Answers (3)

​Capillaries are easy

+1

Capillaries are easy. The pulse dye laser is the industry gold standard for treating these on the face. If we can really “turn up the juice” and leave you with some temporary (1 week) bruising, I can do these in one session. If we have to use more mild settings then it may take me 2-3.


New York Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

V-Beam treatments

+1

Without seeing you in person or having the opportunity to view your picture, it is difficult to say how many treatments you would need.  Full results usually require three or more treatments spaced one month apart.  Non-purpuric (non-bruising) settings require more treatment sessions than when purpuric settings are used since lower energies are used for non-purpuric treatments.  I suggest that you schedule an in-person evaluation with a Board Certified dermatologist with experience in lasers to help determine the best treatment regimen for you. 

Joshua L. Fox, MD
Long Island Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Vessels and Redness need 2-3 treatments with the VBeam

+1

In general, 2-3 treatments with the VBeam can improve enlarged vessels and redness.  Over time, these can return.  Some people this is a year, some a few years.  There is no major side effects other than slight redness and maybe some swelling which lasts a couple hours, at most, overnight.  

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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