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Will Weight Lifting Affect Rhinoplasty Results?

Will lifting weights a month after Rhinoplasty delay/stunt the development of the nose's definition and swelling reduction?

Say if a nose will typically reduce in swelling in two months, would lifting weights stretch that to three or four months? Would you advise waiting perhaps two months after?

Doctor Answers (7)

Exercise after rhinoplasty

+3

Your surgeon has probably given you fairly strict criteria to follow to best enable your nose to heal appropriately following your rhinoplasty surgery. You should be able to engage in more vigorous activity after a few weeks following your surgery. I always tell my patients that if they feel pressure or notice increased swelling, especially in the morning the day following their exercise, they should ease up on their activity until they are not experiencing any of these symptoms.

As far as weight lifting is concerned, I do not see any problem with it after one month following rhinoplasty plastic surgery, but I would engage in exercises that you can do in an upright position so that you decrease the potential for prolonged nasal edema.


Chevy Chase Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Weight lifting after rhinoplasty

+1
Recovery after rhinoplasty will vary based on the person, characteristics of the nasal tissues and what was done during surgery. The amount of downtime varies greatly as well.

Typically, somewhere between 4-6 weeks, you can return to strenuous activities including intense exercise and weight lifting. At this point, it should not cause any damage to your nose and should not alter the degree of swelling or time for this to resolve.

You should clarify with your surgeon what restrictions you have and when you can return to strenuous activities.

Jamil Ahmad, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Wait 6 weeks before exercising

+1
I generally recommend to my patients that they refrain from exercising for 6 weeks after surgery. Exercising can contribute to swelling, which will slow down your rate of recovery. 

Jerome Edelstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

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Weight lifting after rhinoplasty

+1

Weightlifting a month after the rhinoplasty surgery will not affect the results of the rhinoplasty and is acceptable to do so at this time. Full healing of the nose is going to take approximately a year for all the swelling in the nose to subside and reveal the final result.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Weight Lifting After Rhinoplasty, Mr. Schwarzenegger?

+1

Hi Mr. Atlas,

Weight lifting four weeks after rhinoplasty should not affect your healing. Weight lift during the first week after surgery as one of my patients once did (clearly not following directions) will get you a severe nose bleed that will require packing.

Do follow your rhinoplasty surgeons advice.

Enjoy your new nose and your rest from the weights.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Weight lifting is ok at 1 month at half-2/3 of your regular weight.

+1

Wait 6-8 weeks for maximum weight lifting. You may get a little more swelling, but not noticeable to people after this. But it will go down in a day or two. You see NBA players playing days after nasal surgery. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Weight lifting after rhinoplasty

+1

This is a question best asked of your surgeon, but a month after surgery, I can't imagine lifting weights impacting your healing time very much. As long as you're not on you're not upside down or prone (two positions that would contribute to swelling) I think you're OK, but again, I would run it by your surgeon.

Dr. Singer

Elan B. Singer, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.