New Injectable Uses Your Own Skin to Repair Wrinkles

K. Mathews on 8 Nov 2011 at 12:00am

LaViv before and after

Looking for a more “natural” approach to removing wrinkles? After an extensive research period, the FDA has approved laViv, “a soft-tissue stimulator made specifically for each individual patient from her own skin”, reports Joan Kron for Allure magazine. This latest beauty advancement could be a welcomed solution for people who hate their wrinkles, but also don’t want to put collagen and other unnatural materials into their bodies.

With the patient’s own cells, doctors can soften harsh smile lines. But using laViv is a long-term process. In layman's terms: 

  1. Doctors remove a few small flakes of skin from a patient 
  2. They are sent to a lab where they're multiplied over the course of three months
  3. Cells are stored and sent to patients ready for an injection when requested. 

Typically, patients will undergo three injection sessions about a month apart, with results lasting upwards of half a year.  

The FDA has only approved laViv for boosting the body’s collagen production to minimize wrinkles, but RealSelf member Sallynappa already asked the doctors whether laViv would improve her acne scars. Dr. Mark Taylor, a Salt Lake City dermatologist, responded that it could be useful, but he still recommends Perlane or Juvederm for that purpose. 

If the results are as good as advertised, one of the biggest reasons to switch from other fillers is the personal and natural make-up of laViv. As Kron points out: "There is no chance of an allergic reaction or delayed lumps or abscesses (which do occur on occasion with synthetic fillers and tissue stimulators). The only side effects seen in the multi-center studies were short-lived, injection-site reactions such as swelling and bruising."

LaViv's website doesn't state who is administering yet, but you can sign up for updates if you're interested. If you use it, come back and let us know what you thought!  

Photo credit: laviv 

Comments (2)

I wonder, too. I've been checking out the hyaluronic acid fillers, which is a substance that is supposedly in the human body, but must be a synthetic version? I would totally go for something more natural. It does seem like a lot of trouble for something that only last 6 months though. That's the problem with all the fillers...

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I wonder why it's only for smile lines? Will be interesting to see where this one goes! When I'm ready for wrinkle fighting treatments, I'd definitely prefer to use something that more or less comes from my own body. Cost will definitely be a factor though -- I wonder how it will compare to synthetic fillers? 

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