Botox, Wrinkle Fighter and Mood Booster?

A. Foley on 2 Oct 2012 at 9:00am

Botox has been touted for its skin smoothing results, but according to the first randomized, controlled study on the effect of botulinum toxin, benefits may include a better mood. The 16-week study appeared in the Journal of Psychiatric Research earlier this year and reported that the face's inability to register emotion post-Botox may help those with treatment resistant depression. 

Participants in the treatment group were given one dose (five injections) of Botox between and just above the eyebrows, whereas the control group was given placebo injections. Symptoms of depression in the treatment group reportedly decreased 47% after six weeks, and remained at that level through the study period. In comparison, the placebo group had a 9% reduction in symptoms. 

M. Axel Wollmer of the University of Basel, who led the study, says that since Botox "interrupts feedback from the facial musculature to the brain, which may be involved in the development and maintenance of negative emotions," it may be able to regulate depression. The topic has come up before in RealSelf forums, and one patient - though he acknowledged it is NOT a replacement for medication - claimed it helped his overall state of mind

Considering claims that smile therapy has an effect on overall disposition, it's possible "not frowning" could have similar results. Some people also may simply feel better when they feel they look better, too. However, be warned that the numbness that may come with prohibiting frowns has been a concern for some RealSelf community members.  

 

Do you think that $425 (average cost) Botox treatments could have the dual benefit of wrinkle smoother and mood enhancer? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

 

photo credit: OtnaYdur | deposit photos

 

Comments (6)

Botox is an injection which is used for what is considered to be smile therapy. It is important for looking and feeling better. This is also beneficial wrinkle smoother. Botox Perth
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Nice blog. Botox is also a proficient treatment which is much cheaper than other insidious procedures.
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MedWatch: The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event ... www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/default.htm How to report adverse events/reactions to medications, drug products or medical devices to the Food and Drug Administration voluntary reporting system.
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I contracted pleurisy after having botox does anyone know if there's a connection.
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Look forward to seeing what others have to say but as a nurse I find it difficult to see a connection between the two. However what you can do is go to the FDA website and to a MedWatch search ( it's database where healthcare professionals,manufacturers , and/or the public) report adverse events that they feel could possibly be related to the drug. They even report the degree in which they feel its related to the drug as in definitely related, possibly related, unlikely related etc. I would look there to see if this type of event has ever been reported w Botox use. Sincerely. Me
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I think the theory behind this! Lol. It is common knowledge we have muscle memory. I like the idea of interrupting that trained muscle behavior to block the depression impulses associated with frowning. Sneaky way to combat that depression. Very cool indeed.
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