Paper tape allergy (Photo)

I have been itching like crazy so I got home and took everything off and noticed that I am developing an allergic reaction to the paper tape that is covering my incision. I called the Ps and they told me to stop the tape, cover with pads and take benadryl before i see them tomorrow. Anyone experienced this?

Doctor Answers 13

Dr Derby Sang

This happens quite often and it is really a discomfort for the patient , it can be very itchy and red underneath and around the area where the tape was placed. Taking some anti allergy medication sometimes helps like benadryl or Claritin. Best of luck


Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Paper tape allergy (Photo)

Yes, I have seen this before.  Some of my patients had developed allergy  to the tape, is really a discomfort for the patient.

Follow your PS instructions, this will go away.

Adolfo Sesto, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Allergy to Tape

This is quite common and usually resolves quickly once the tape is removed. It is important to continue to follow-up closely with your plastic surgeon especially if the redness is not resolving. 

#PlasticSurgery #Tapeallergy #Healing

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Allergy

Thank you for your question and photos.  Yes it is not uncommon.  Many people are susceptible to the adhesive in some surgical tapes.  You apparently are one of these people.  I also recommend to my patients that they take Claritin during the day, as it will not make you drowsy like Benadryl.  Topical anti-inflammatory drugs such as Benadryl cream can help.

All the best,

Dr. Results
Miami, FL

Allergy to paper tape

The adhesive in paper tape can sometimes produce an allergic reaction.  It usually resolves fairly rapidly with discontinuing the tape.  Follow your surgeon's advice.  Good luck.  Donald R. Nunn MD  Atlanta Plastic Surgeon

Donald Nunn, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Allergy

Hi boavi22, what your experiencing is not uncommon. Your surgeon's instructions are what I would tell my patients and great that you are following up with them tomorrow. Best of luck to you. -Dr. Coan

Brian Coan, MD, FACS
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Allergic reactions to adhesive

An allergic reaction to the adhesives used to cover incisions is not uncommon. The advice your plastic surgeon gave you is what I would tell my patients as well. Be sure to keep your follow up appointment tomorrow.



Thank you for your question and for sharing your pictures!


Melinda Lacerna, MD FACS

Paper Tape Allergy.

Thank you for your question. A minor allergic reaction to tape is not uncommon. Not to worry, Benadryl will help take the itch away. 

Sincerely Yours, 

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 425 reviews

Tape allergy

This can happen and what your PS recommended is usually the solution to the problem.  You can also try anti-itch cream to the affected area.

Anh Lee, MD
El Paso Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Tape Allergy

Allergic reaction to tape is not uncommon. In fact, it happens often enough that I usually recommend patients to use their bra to keep dressings on the breast in place. For other areas like to abdomen, I recommend using the minimum amount of paper tape as needed and to use form fitting underwear to help secure the dressing. 

The prep solution used to cleanse the surgical site usually causes drying of the skin which can exacerbate the itching and redness of skin where the tape is placed. You can apply calamine lotion to the affected areas in addition to taking benadryl. Avoid scratching the area as this may make the itching worse.

Kenty Sian, MD
Fresno Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.