Can Anything Be Done To Reshape a Nose With a BULBOUS NASAL TIP?

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Poets can write volumes on the eyes, about how they are the mirror to the soul and the most expressive feature to be found on the face. It’s true. The eyes can tell you a lot. You can detect joy, pain, attraction, boredom and a host of other emotions. However, never doubt that an enlarged or misshapen nose can pull all attention away from the most beautiful of eyes. The broad or bulbous nasal tip is a common motive of people seeking rhinoplasty for just this reason.

Rhinoplasty, or nose job, is a surgical procedure typically performed for either functional or aesthetic reasons. There may be structural issues that are contributing to breathing problems or interfering with sleeping or eating. On the other hand, everything may work perfectly, but there may be something about the appearance of the nose that is creating self-esteem or confidence issues for the individual. The bulbous nasal tip, which can include the tip of a nose that is enlarged, bulb-shaped, upturned, hooked or drooping, falls into this last category.

A misshapen nose can be a glaring focal point that does anything but get better as we age. As Dr. Geoffrey Tobias was quoted in Vogue Magazine:

“A slightly bulbous nose, when you were eighteen years old looked cute,” Tobias said. “When you’re 35 years old, it doesn’t look so cute anymore, because the bulbous tip and the bump are associated with aging process.”

The results of a successful surgery reshaping the tip of the nose can have tremendous impact for the patient. Nevertheless, this particular surgery has been particularly challenging from the beginning. The diverse anatomy of the nose tip makes the importance of working only with the most experienced surgeon paramount. It requires an in-depth understanding of what caused the broad nasal tip and the best tools and techniques for shaping it. Some of the more important factors to take into consideration are the thickness of the individual’s skin, racial characteristics and strength of the cartilage. This is even more essential during secondary or revision rhinoplasty when much of the cartilage may be gone or damaged.

No matter what surgical approach is determined to be correct, it cannot be overemphasized that the end result is contingent in maintaining or increasing the structural integrity of the tip of the nose. There is always the cost/benefit equation to consider when making important decisions. The benefit here can be significant, perhaps even life-changing. The cost, however, beyond the monetary charge for the procedure and all related aspects, is considerable. No surgery should be taken likely but, with this one, just the postoperative swelling could be something that the patient will have to deal with for months to, believe it or not, years.

Article by
Englewood Facial Plastic Surgeon