Endoscopic Browlift

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There have been several advances in browlift technique in recent years. The most modern is the minimally invasive method called endoscopic browlift. Several small incisions are made in the hair and small endoscopes combined with video cameras are placed underneath the skin. Using this indirect instrumentation, the muscles and underlying structures are resuspended. No skin is removed and the hairline stays in approximately the same position, while the eyebrows are moved up. With the older method called a coronal lift, hair-bearing scalp was removed and the hairline moved up, often unnaturally high. Since her coronal lift, Liz Taylor has been forced to wear bangs; if you look closely, you'll see how receded her hairline is. An alternative method, a direct browlift, results in visible scars directly at or over the eyebrows themselves. (Sylvester Stallone had a direct eyebrow lift before endoscopic techniques were widely available.) The incisions can also be placed within the forehead creases and become less noticeable with aging, but that isn't exactly the point, is it? Dr. Szachowicz believes "the endoscopic browlift is the technique of choice today. In the right hands it offers ever advantage: less scarring, no hair loss, faster healing." Since the eyes are the first to show signs of aging, it makes sense that the browlift is popular. The browlift is much more common than a facelift for the 35 to 45 year-old. Take your finger and feel along your eyebrow. That bony ridge underneath is called the orbital rim. With age, the eyebrow drops to or below that rim, creating a tired or angry look. Taking out upper lid skin with a blepharoplasty would not raise the brow and might even lower it further. To create an open, alert expression requires repositioning of the eyebrows. Some things should be avoided. If too much glabellar muscle (the one that furrows the brows) is removed the eyebrows spring apart and give the appearance of being too widely spaced - just like a bad pluck job. Destroying the frontalis muscle (responsible for the horizontal forehead wrinkles) can give a frozen, expressionless appearance to the upper third of the face (look at Barbara Walters). Surgically pulling the eyebrow up medially results in a perpetually surprised look, not glamour. The positioning of the eyebrow requires careful consideration of aesthetics. Skilled makeup artists often shape the eyebrow by tweezing and makeup, accenting the arch to flatter the shape of the eye. Look through the glamour magazines and study the contour of the models' eyebrows. In most, the arch is placed in the outermost third, not the middle. Most male physicians spend little time working with eyebrow pencils, so choose your surgeon carefully. Video imaging may be the best way to guarantee that your surgeon's tast matches your own.

 

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Minneapolis Facial Plastic Surgeon