Busting the 4 Biggest Myths about Breast Augmentation

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One of the most popular programs on television today is Discovery Channel's scientific entertainment series "MythBusters," a reality show that makes use of the scientific method to test out and sometimes debunk popular rumors and myths. Plastic surgeons might benefit from the help of the MythBusters team to help disprove a number of common misconceptions about their work, especially when it comes to breast augmentation. In fact, there is still a great deal of misunderstanding about breast implants, in spite of the extensive information available on the web and from doctors themselves. Here's a closer look at a few of the most persistent breast augmentation myths.

  1.  Myth: All Implants Look Fake When breast implants first became widely popular, the preferred aesthetic for many women was big, bold, and obviously augmented. While some women still want this look, the majority of them opt for a more modest enhancement of their natural contours, and the best breast augmentation surgeons aspire to give their patients exactly that. By carefully considering breast implant factors like profile, placement, and a patient's unique measurements, natural-looking breast augmentation is the norm rather than the exception. With today's innovations in breast implants, skilled plastic surgeons can create elegant, subtle breast augmentations that let the patient's inherent beauty shine through.

  2. Myth: Implants Have to Be Large The idea that breast implants have to be huge is another outdated misconception. The truth is that beautiful breast enhancements can come in much smaller packages, and more often than you might realize. With the increasing demand for more realistic images of female beauty in the media, plastic surgeons have seen a similarly growing demand for smaller, more proportionate breast implants.

    Innovations in plastic surgery technology such as Vectra 3D imaging help surgeons take the guesswork out of sizing. By capturing a three-dimensional image of the patient's body and then showing lifelike computer renderings of how different implant volumes are likely to look on the actual patient's proportions, surgeons are able to give their breast augmentation patients far more accurate ideas of how breast implants of different sizes will actually look. 

  3. Myth: Implants Change Breast Placement When breasts look droopy or deflated following childbirth, nursing, or simply as a result of gravity and age, implants usually are not enough to restore the perky look many women hope for. While implants can increase breast size, they cannot change breast placement on the chest wall. For patients with significant sagging (ptosis) and a loss of fullness, breast implants combined with a breast lift are most likely to deliver a satisfying outcome. If you’re not sure whether or not a breast lift is right for you, check with your surgeon during your initial consultation to discuss your options.

  4. Myth: Silicone Implants Aren't Safe While there has been debate over the risk of complications with older silicone implant models from before the turn of the new millennium, modern silicone gel implants have an excellent safety record. Any woman who is now considering breast augmentation needs to understand that the latest generations of silicone gel implants have a solid track record of safety and are likely some of the most studied medical devices in the history of medicine.
The FDA has approved the use of silicone gel breast implants for primary breast augmentation in women age 22 and older. Ongoing studies of modern silicone gel implants have found a safety profile similar to that of saline breast implants, which have been in use for over four decades. Your surgeon will be able to share more specific study results and talk with you about the latest findings during your consultation, but the safety of modern silicone gel implants, coupled with their more natural look and feel, has led them to become the primary implant option for women today.
Article by
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon