Is There a Certain Weight That You Have to Be in Order to Have Gynecomastia Surgery?

I am 5"8 - 5"9 and weigh about 232 would I have to lose more weight in order to have the surgery?

Doctor Answers (13)

Gynecomastia and being overweight are separate problems.

+2

Hi.

Losing weight is very hard. I think you can have correction of gynecomastia anytime. You will still be overweight after wards, but your chest will be flat and you will look and feel better. It may motivate you to lose weight.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Weight and gynecomastia

+1
It is certainly possible that, with weight loss, the gynecomastia will improve such that you might avoid surgery so I would encourage you to reach and remain at your ideal weight for six months before having surgery. If you had the surgery first and then lost a significant amount of weight, you could have skin sagging.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

You might also like...

Gynecomastia Surgery and Weight Loss?

+1

Thank you for the question.

In general, I think would be your best interest to undergo  correction of gynecomastia surgery when you are as close to a “stable” weight as possible. I have found that gynecomastia is often best treated with  partial excision of the prominent glandular tissue  as well as liposuction surgery of the peripheral chest area. On the other hand, if the prominence of the chest wall is caused by adipose tissue, then liposculpture surgery alone may suffice.

Either way,  being closer to your ideal weight will allow the surgeon to treat any adipose tissue that is diet and exercise resistant in a more accurate fashion;  therefore, you will be more likely to achieve the best result possible.

Please make sure you're working with a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 726 reviews

At a BMI of 34/35 weight loss prior to gynecomastia surgery is recommended but not mandatory

+1

At 5'8" to 5'9" and at 232 pounds you are definitely overweight with a BMI of 34 - 35. Does this preclude you from having surgery? No.

However, if you could lose some weight prior to surgery - around 30 pounds - that would help provide you with the potential for a better result with less surgical and anesthesia risk and it would be prudent. The weight loss would not be a deal breaker, though.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Male breast reduction surgery and weight loss

+1

If you do lose weight prior to this surgery - you may be surprised that your chest may change as well.  Typically, breasts have a certain percentage of fatty tissue.  As you loose weight, the fatty tissue may decrease. 

George John Alexander, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Best weight for gynecomastia repair (male breast reduction)?

+1

Weight is not the main factor. The shape of your chest is the main issue. Is there a lot of loose skin? Or is it just diffusely large. So weight is less important than actual BMI and you should try to lower your BMI below 30 for best results. With the amount of excess weight you have I think your best bet would be achieve this by losing about 30 more pounds and then be evaluated.

Andrew Kaczynski, MD
Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Gynecomastia and weight loss

+1

It is always better to lose weight before having surgery.  Getting down to your goal weight is a good idea.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Gynecomastia and Weight

+1

AT 69" and 232lbs your BMI is calculated to be 34.3 which is considered obese. Your ideal body weight (IBW) would be closer to 160lbs. Therefore you should preferably lose a minimum of 50 lbs in order to come within 15% of your IBW. However, if you intend on regaining the weight after surgery, it is not generally advised.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Weight loss and gynecomastia surgery

+1

In general, the closer you are to your goal weight the better results you will get.  As you lose the weight, you will probably lose some of the fullness on your chest as well, which will allow it to contract down a bit better after your procedure.  Ultimately this decision is between you and your surgeon, but I think we would all agree at least some weight loss would be a good idea.

Shahram Salemy, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.