Deflation Before Explantation?

I recently decided to have my implants removed after 14 years! I have met with a number of surgeons all who recommended explantation with a lift. The last surgeon I met with proposed deflating them first and then removing the implants. Frankly this is most appealing to me but it concerns me that no other surgeons presented this idea! I am interested to know if this is a good option and if I should be concerned with saline leakage into my body after the deflation?

Doctor Answers (10)

Deflation before Breast Implant Removal

+1

Thank you for your question.

It sounds like this surgeon wants to allow the skin to contract back prior to surgery... which, although unusual, is one of the many options available for surgeons.

Hope this helps.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 680 reviews

Removing breast implants

+1

Deflating the implants is commonly done to assist with implant removal and prevent longer incisions from being used.  The FDA has found no increased risk with leakage from silicone and saline implants.

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Breast imlpant deflation to assess size and need for lift prior to explantation

+1

I have performed this on occasion for a varietuy of reasons including patients who are undecided about implant removal and/or replacement with weight gain or if they were uncertain about the implant volume and its role in the size of the currentl breast or have any concerns about their postoperative apperance. Generally speaking you will see nice contraction within two weeks. I think this sounds like a great plan!

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

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Deflating Breast Implants Before Removing Them

+1

There are two reasons why you would deflate an implant before removing them. 1) Deflating the implant and allowing the skin to gradually tighten may limit the amount of skin excision needed and 2) If there was significant asymmetry then deflation will allow more accurate preoperative markings and surgical planning.

In most cases however, if the ultimate goal is to remove the implants, then it really isn't necessary to deflate the implants beforehand. Also, there is no harm in saline leaking into your body after the deflation. 

Hope that helps and good luck!

Dr. Babak Dadvand 

Babak Dadvand, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Deflation of implants is not necessary as a first step.

+1

If you wish to have the implants removed and have the best shape and contour of your breasts after, i recommend explantation with a lift at the same time.  In properly selected patients,  this is safe and effective.  Deflation first, is not necessary and would not add anything to the final result.  There should be no concern about leaking of the saline from the implants.  This saline is the same that is in IV fluid and your body will simply absorb it.

Jeffrey M. Darrow, MD
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Deflation prior to explantation

+1

I don't see the point of deflating the implants without removing them. Even if you chose no to do a lift, in some cases the remaining breast tissue can be re-approximated to optimize the result, Ask your surgeon the logic behind the plan. If most of the surgeon you saw are recommending a lift, there might be a reson. Without photos it is impossible to give you better advice.

Good luck

Jose M. Soler-Baillo, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Explantation and lift

+1

I have heard this before for saline implants, and I suppose it is a good idea if there was alot of asymmetry.  Otherwise I do not think it is necessary. 

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Explantation Breast Implant

+1

If you desire explantation without replacement, then deflating the implants to see how the breast will look after explantation. This will gove an idea but not the real look. Because you still have the deflated implant and the capsule.If you plan to have the implant replaced, you will pay for the new set of implants.

if the reason of deflation is to see if you need a lift, then it may give you an idea.

Remember that deflation means putting a needle to deflate the implants and you will have a small risk of infection.

Decide what you ultimately want then decide, who to do the surgery and what type of surgery you will be happy with.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Deflation prior to explantation.

+1

You have to ask the surgeon what the purpose of deflating the implant is .At 14 years the implant manufacturer does not reimburse for deflation, they give replacement implants for life. If it is to get a set of implants it would be unethical.

If the purpose of breaking the implants prior to removal is to let the capsule shrink that is not the best way either.

If you are not having the implants replaced it is better to remove the entire capsule if possible at the time of implant removal , it is actually easier to remove the capsule with the implant inflated than to remove it without the implant in place. Some do not believe the removal of the capsule is needed and in some patients it  is not a problem but in many leaving the capsule becomes a problem.

You should ask the "last surgeon" why he wants to do it that way . 

Walter D. Gracia, MD
Arlington Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Deflating implants

+1

In some specific cases, it does make sense to pop the implants and deflate them.  Of course, they need to be saline.  The benefit of doing this is that it will help you decide whether to simply have the implants removed because you will know what you will look like after a simple removal, which can subsequently be doe under local anesthesia.

Ronald J. Edelson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.