Ask a doctor

Possible to Botox for a wider eyed appearance on a close-set-eyed woman?

When I pull my brows apart gently (with one finger above each) HORIZONTALLY, I love the effects. Basically, I'm elongating my brows. I don't LIFT my brows, as I think their height is perfect. When I do the "pull" I notice it feels better, too, because it's taking the pressure off my muscles from constantly having to relax. 1. Can Botox be used to recreate the "pull" I perform in the mirror? 2. Which muscles and techniques would be involved for this unusual request?

Doctor Answers (9)

Botox for close-set-eyed woman

+2
Dear Elemgee,

When you frown, you will see that your brows will move inward and downward towards your nose. This actually shorten your brows, the opposite effect of when you pull your brows sideways. Basically, there are at least 3 muscles that pulls your brows, the corrugator muscle, procerus muscle, and the inner part of the orbicularis muscle. 
Even at rest, there are some tone of these muscles going on. Botox injection will temporarily paralyze these muscles, thus relaxing the tone. This will result in widening the distance between the brows and make the brows look longer.


Thailand Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Botox effect on eyebrows

+2

Hi,

Unfortunately most doctors inject Botox in most patients in the same way without truly examining each patient's unique anatomy and muscle function.  Botox can be injected in a variety of ways.  

What you are asking for is to spread the eyebrows apart.  This can be done easily depending on the resting tone of your muscles.  

Shervin Naderi, MD, FACS
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Botox to elongate the eye brow

+1
Thank you for your question. 

Botox injections will paralyze the muscle between your brows and the superficial deep wrinkles will become less noticeable. This creates the appearance of a longer brow. However, it is difficult to assess your particular problem without a photograph. Most likely you would benefit from Botox treatment.

Best of luck, make sure you see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.

Rondi Kathleen Walker, MD
Washington Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

You might also like...

Botox Treatment to Achieve Wider Set Eyes

+1
By injecting the glabella region with Botox, you can create a 'lift' in between the brows, which will possibly create wider set eyes. It’s hard to say without assessing your face in person. Make sure you see an expert facial plastic surgeon who knows how to implement the correct facial rejuvenation treatment for your face.

Babak Azizzadeh, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Neuromodulators (Botox, Dysport, Xeomin) Can Work To Create A Wider-Eyed Appearance

+1
I have been injecting Botox for aestheitic reasons for approximately 23 years.  Its earliest use was for treating the three muscles of facial expression located between the eyebrows that together contribute to a scowling, frowning or angry look and to narrowing the distance between the eyebrows. Properly injected, small amounts of any of the currently available neuromodulators, Botox, Dysport or Xeomin can help to relax those downward and inwardly pulling muscles allowing the eyebrows to widen, an effect that imparts a wider-eyed look and a more relaxed appearance overall.

We have learned much in the more than two decades I have been involved in this field. Where once there was literally a  a cookbook approach to  treating these muscles, we have since learned that there can be a number of variations in the position and strength of these muscles between people and between genders. For this reason, it is important to seek consultation with a board certified aesthetic physician with extensive experience in the use of neuromodulators to ensure that treatment is tailored to your specific needs..  

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Botox for Wider Set Eyes

+1
Botox is a great way to improve the appearance of the eyes, whether its by uplifting or elongating. My best recommendation to you would be to visit a board certified dermatologist or experienced injector for a consultation before undergoing treatment.

Cheryl A. Hull, MD
Rogers Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Using Botox to Separate the Eyes

+1

Yes, Botox Cosmetic is very useful for adjusting the look around the eyes.  Experienced injectors can achieve many of the things you are describing.  My suggestion is that you consult with a board certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon in your area who is experienced in Botox injections.

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Botox can be adjusted to create several different looks

+1

It is true that Botox injection by a properly trained board certified dermatologist, plastic surgeon or Oculoplastic surgeon could create many of the desired results you are asking for. 

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Effect of botox.

+1

Botox is a muscle relaxer, not a muscle puller. When used artfully it can be used to add some definition and shape to the brow depending upon which muscles we relax.

In my own practice we commonly soften and drop the mid brow by weakening the forehead elevators and weakening the depressors of the lateral brow.

There is no true horizontal muscle that will make the brows move in just one direction. The corrugator muscles make us frown.  Relaxing these muscles may bring the brow outward as well as upward.

You may want to try small doses of botox in this area to see if this accomplishes your goal. If it doesn't do what you want the botox will wear off in a few months.

Thanks for the question and best wishes.

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.