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Fraxel Vs IPL for Fine Lines Around the Eyes?

Is IPL or Fraxel laser better for reducing fine lines and eye wrinkles?

Doctor Answers (20)

Fraxel for Fine Lines

+5

Hi Sims,

Fraxel re:pair is a great treatment for fine lines around the eyes.

IPL is better suited for superficial pigment improvement.

Good luck and be well. Dr. P


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

For fine eye wrinkles, IPL is the wrong option

+5

Every device has its unique characteristics to give a certain result.

IPL helps brown and red discoloration of the skin.
The combination of Botox and Fractional CO2 is the best for lines.
Fraxel Restore and Botox is for those who can't have downtime.
Eyelid surgery is the best choice for eye bags and sagging.

The real chioice is the doctor. Choose someone board certified in an appropriate field of medicine and who has the experience to choose the right option for YOU.

Mary P. Lupo, MD
New Orleans Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Botox is still the treatment of choice for fine lines around eyes

+4

Fraxel has a better chance to provide long term improvement from new collagen formation by your skin and might even produce slight tightening of the skin below the eyes.

Botox still is the treatment of choice for the lines near the corner of the eyes.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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Fraxel and Botox work great for eye wrinkles

+4

IPL is great for red and brown discoloration but doesn't treat wrinkles.

Your best bet is using Botox and then Fraxel, the Fraxel CO2 re:pair will work better than the Fraxel re:store but either one would be beneficial.

I recommend you have a treatment with Botox around your eyes before your laser treatment and your results will be even better.

The Botox allows the new collagen forming to settle in smoother and also allows the laser to penetrate better into the deepest part of the wrinkles.

Lorrie Klein, MD
Laguna Niguel Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 171 reviews

Fraxel vs IPL? Fraxel is better for eye wrinkles

+3

IPL is great for sun damage, rosacea, broken blood vessels or any pigmentation disorders. IPL is also not recommended to be used very close under the eyes.

Fraxel will improve the appearance of fine lines around the eyes by stimulating the collagen production and the restoring the skin elasticity. Multiple treatments might be necessary but the results last for a long time.

Using a good eye cream, such as Obagi's Elastiderm, twice daily will maintain the results and prevent aging.

Gregory Turowski, MD, PhD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

For fine lines around eyes (crow's feet), multiple Fraxel treatments are better than IPL

+3

Crow's feet lines can be significantly improved with Botox since these are movement related wrinkles.

IPL is used primarily for pigmentation (brown lentigenes) and telangiectasia and redness. IPL will not improve wrinkles.

Fraxel may help with infraorbital crepiness (mild lines and skin laxity inferior to the lower eyelid), however, multiple treatments are necessary.

Felix Kuo, MD
Long Island Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Fine eye wrinkles, crow's feet can be reduced with Botox and laser treatment

+3

It truly depends upon how fine those lines are and where they are located. If you are speaking of Crow's feet at the outside corner of the eyes, these can be treated by Botox Cosmetic.

If they are deeper wrinkles, fractional resurfacing will help to further reduce them. If you are referring to the lines on the lower lids that cause crepiness to the skin, the same regimen may work.

Many clients, though, may need traditional resurfacing to this skin as well. If Botox is used prior, there are some clients who can obtain nice tightening from the inclusion of Thermage around the eyelids.

The majority of patients that I treat benefit from a combination of Botox and Mixto fractional laser resurfacing. This treatment takes approximately 15 minutes time and is performed with or without topical (gel) anesthesia.

I hope this helps.

Mark Berkowitz, MD
Sterling Heights Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Botox with Fraxel better than IPL for fine lines around eyes

+2

From what we've seen in our clinic, we find it works best for the client to do a combination of Botox and Fraxel. We recommend the client first get injected with Botox at least 7-10 days before getting Fraxel, so it will be in complete effect. And then we recommend 4-6 treatments of Fraxel there after.

Botox is an important part of this treatmet, because as we resurface the area with Fraxel, we find the result much smoother with not being able to re-create those creases as it heals.

We find as far as textural issues go in the skin, Fraxel is far superior to the IPL.

Patrick S. Carney, MD
Minnesota Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Treating eye wrinkles with Botox and CO2 laser resurfacing

+2

In our experinece, the best treatment for the fine lines around the eyes has been a combination of Botox injections and Active FX with Deep FX fractional CO2 resurfacing. IPL does not really address this area.

Fraxel Re:store does not address it well, and Fraxel Re:pair might be approximating Active FX in achieveing wrinkle improvement.

Stella Desyatnikova, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

IPL Would Not Be My First Choice for Fine Lines around the Eyes but Do Grow Collagen

+1
IPLs are best to treat reds and browns on the skin, but work done many years ago showed collagen thickening with IPL therapy. Most would not choose IPLs for this question at hand, but the reality is that it will help. A combination of fractional lasers and IPLs will work the best, along with good skin care.

Michael Gold, MD
Nashville Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.