Ask a doctor

Does Fraxel Actually Work on White Stretch Marks?

I have had my stretch marks for about 6 years. They are a white/silvery color. Will Fraxel actually help?

Doctor Answers (8)

Fraxel Laser and Stretch Marks

+1

Thank you for your question. Unfortunately, the stretch mark that has been there for awhile will not go away. The only way to minimize stretch marks is surgery, for example, tummy tuck for stretch marks on abdomen. I hope this helps.


Bay Area Dermatologist
4.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Fraxel for Stretch Marks

+1

Fraxel restore has been found to work well for improving the appearance of white stretch marks.

Sabrina Fabi, MD
San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Fraxel for White Stretch Marks

+1

Fraxel  Re:Store may gradually help white stretch marks, but the degree of improvement is in the range of 25 – 50 %. Whether this is worth doing often requires a test area to decide whether to treat all areas or not. Using Retin-A topically at the same time as doing laser treatments may boost the response as well. There is a recent study showing that delivery of Retin-A into small laser channels (giving much higher tissue levels) done on a monthly basis x4 treatments was very successful as a treatment for white stretch marks.

Richard Fitzpatrick, MD (in memoriam)
San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

You might also like...

Fraxel for stretch marks

+1

Fraxel works great on red and pink stretch marks. However it will definitely help improve the appereance of your stretch marks.

Jhonny Salomon, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Fraxel is approved for stretch marks

+1

Fraxel helps improve the appearance of old white stretch marks.  A test patch is important to avoid hyperpigmentation when treating skin of color.  It is done with topical anesthetic cream so it is not painful.  Multiple treatments can be done with incremental improvement expected with each treatment.

Daryl K. Hoffman, MD
Los Gatos Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Best Treatment for Stretch Marks

+1

Hi rr,   I agree with Drs. Reichel and Weiner.  I have found that Fraxel repair (fractionated CO2 laser) works the best for stretch marks.  It takes a series of treatments for best results.  Again, expect improvement but not resolution of the stretch marks.  An East African oil, Marula Oil, has been used to treat newly formed stretched marks with success.  Good luck and be well.   Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Fraxel for Stretch Marks

+1

Lets start with this: Stretch marks, especially white ones, are very hard to treat. If they are new and red, the Vbeam Perfecta laser can work really well. For white stretch marks, I think the Fraxel Restore probably works the best. However, you will only get a percentage of improvement, and it varies from patient to patient. I always start with a small test area and treat that area for a series of 4 treatments (spaced 4-6 weeks apart) and then the patient and I evaluate if it is worth it to do a larger area. One of the risks of the Fraxel off of the face is that you can get a red/brown discoloration. So we have to watch for this too. The other option would be to try a fractional CO2 laser such as the Lumenis Total FX. You can have some improvement with this too. Again - test patch.

Jennifer Reichel, MD
Seattle Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Fraxel Dual works for mature white stretch marks but won't resolve them

+1

I have treated several people for this problem.  The best you can expect is about 40% improvement, and thats after about 4-5 treatments.  There really is no other treatments available for this problem other than excision.  

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.