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I Have One Eye That Opens More Than the Other? (photo)

Sooo I have a lazy eye (my eyball) wonders around...I guess they call it cross eyed. But I also have my other eye open way more than this one .. Looks like I have a glass Eye ( i have been asked this many times..I find as I get older it is getting worse..When Im tired . The one that is lazy really gets bad..Can this be fixed..I had one doctor put a weight..into the lid of the eye that open to wide, It was surgically inserted..Didnt work, as the weight pushing againsts my eyeball caused blurred vision.

Doctor Answers (2)

Levator Ptosis Causing Low, Droopy Eyelid

+2

What you describe sounds like levator ptosis.  This is a condition where the muscle that opens your eye has a  weak, stretched attachment to the eyelid and thus struggles to open the eye.  It typically gets worse as the day goes on because the struggling muscle fatigues.  You also frequently see the other eye open too far since your brain tends to signal both eyelid muscles together, meaning that the eye with the normal attachment gets over-opened as your brain desperately tries to get the droopy one to open at all.  A proper exam should be able to confirm your diagnosis.

The correction of levator ptosis involves strengthening the attachment of the muscle to the eyelid.  There are two approaches to the surgery.  One is through the inside of the eyelid and the other involves an incision in the skin on the outside.  The outside method is generally more successful but is slightly more involved and does leave a scar. . . although it is pretty inconspicuous.  


Austin Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

I Have One Eye That Opens More Than the Other?

+1

Over the internet very hard to exactly advise. But either a right levitator repair/BOTIX injections or both vs a left eyelid direct Botox injection to drop it. But again seek ONLY in person evaluations. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.