Ask a doctor

Excess Lower Back Skin from Weight Loss. How to Correct It?

I have lose a lot of weight, I have excess skin in my lower back(along with my stomach) but for the back part bothers me the most. Is there any hope to correcting this?

Doctor Answers (17)

Excess Back Skin After Weight Loss

+2

If there is excess skin, it must be excised to improve the contour. A lower body lift will address the excess skin in your entire trunk, including the abdomen, lateral thighs, flanks, back, and upper buttocks. SOme of this extra skin and fat can be used as a flap to augment your buttocks at the same time. From El Paso.


El Paso Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Lower Body Lift to remove loose skin

+1

If you are considering a lower body lift - this procedure (LBL) is also referred to as  circumferential body lift = belt lipectomy.  This procedure is essentially 3 procedures in one: extended tummy tuck + waist/lateral thigh lift + buttock lift.  The buttock lift can also include buttock augmentation.  The lateral thigh lift will help contour the lateral aspect of your thighs.  The procedure can taken between 5-7 hours depending on the amount of tissue/skin that needs removal/treatment.  Please see a board certified plastic surgeon to learn more about your options.

Dr. Sugene Kim

Sugene Kim, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Plastic Surgery Options After Weight Loss

+1

There is always hope but it depends on how tolerant you are of scars. Once the skin is hanging loose there is no way to significantly tighten it without an excisional procedure and that will always result in a scar. That is the trade off.

Leo Keegan, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

You might also like...

Excess lower back skin after major weight loss--What to do?

+1

If you wish only for the lower back skin excess to be dealt with, a lateral thigh/buttock lift will do the job. Then, after you complete your recovery and return to work, the loose abdominal skin that you didn't think bothered you as much will start to drive you wild! Maybe not, but probably, and then you will question the wisdom of saving the money you would have spent on a beltlift (lower body lift), since now you will spend somewhat more in total cost, as well as have to take off work or social activities again. You see what I mean.

The real problem, I suspect, is finding plastic surgeons who do enough buttock/lateral thigh lifts or lower body lifts to give you good advice and a feeling of confidence about either procedure. Find one or more and seek their advice and recommendations about the pros and cons of either or both options. Make sure you are consulting with American Board of Plastic Surgery-certified plastic surgeons, first, as many "cosmetic surgeons" have neither the training nor the surgical capability to do either of these operations properly.

Also, realize that upper back excisions will NOT adequately correct excess skin laxity in the lower back. Each area requires its own surgical treatment--one operation will not "fix" both areas of concern. Good luck!

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 109 reviews

There are a number of different approaches that have been very effective in

+1

tightening the loose lower back skin following weight loss.  Given the explosion in the number of people opting for Bariatric Surgery to help reduce their weight, we have seen more and more patients who are happy with their weight loss but concerned about the excess sagging skin in many areas, including the lower back.  SInce you also mentioned loose skin the the abdominal area (and an overhanging pannus is very common), I would suggest a "belt" lift that would address both areas effectively in one procedure.  This operation includes an abdominoplasty, but rather that tapering the incision iin the hip area, the upper and lower incisions are continued around the back circumferentially to remove the extra skin in the back.  Just as the Abdominoplasty incision is hidden low in the "bikini line", the back incision is hidden just above the level of the crease.  After healing, patients are happy to have the last visible vestiges of their weight loss removed.

Michael H. Rosenberg, MD
White Plains Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Back lift

+1

It may be useful to see a picture of the areas that bother you. If the loose skin is in the lower back, a lower body lift may help or just a direct lower back skin excision. A consultation with a Board Certified plastic surgeon would be a good place to start.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Weight loss and lower back

+1

You may be a good candidate for a lower body lift which will help lift the buttock region as well as it also works ont he abdomen.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Excision of skin is the best option

+1

From what you have described, it sounds like you would benefit from a circumferential belt lipectomy. A belt lipectomy (or lower body lift), is a great operation for correcting excess laxity and redundancy of skin along the anterior abdomen and lower posterior back.

Kevin Brenner, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Circumferential belt lipectomy: all the way around the waist

+1

Essentially what you need is a circumferential belt lipectomy. this accomplishes a tummy tuck, outer thigh, and buttock lift. In severe cases you may benefit from an upper back lift.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Body lIft

+1

Definitely yes! You could have just a back lift-either upper back or lower or continue around to front and combine that with a tummy tuck which would result in what we call a lower body lift. 

Edward J. Domanskis, MD
Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.