Ask a doctor

Should I Avoid Second Hand Smoke in a Casino 5 Days Before Breast Lift?

I am having a bilateral mastopexy in 5 days. I would like to go out tomorrow night with my husband (possibly to a casino) and there will be smoking. Should I not go because of the second hand smoke? I am not smoking but I am worried about being around it before my surgery. Thank you so much.

Doctor Answers (10)

2nd hand smoke

+1

Absolutely!-- I have had patients several days after surgery  exposed to second hand smoke and develope incision healing problems. The longer you avoid smoke and nicotine prior to your surgery as well as after the procedure, the better off you will be with healing.

Albuquerque Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast Lift and Second Hand Smoke?

+1

Thank you for the question.

Yes, avoidance of secondhand smoke (and all forms of nicotine) is necessary prior to undergoing breast lifting (or any other plastic surgical procedure that involves “flaps”  such as tummy tuck and face lifting surgery).

Nicotine is a powerful constrictor of blood vessels,  decreasing blood flow to the “flaps” used during these procedures. This decrease blood flow could potentially lead to wound healing problems and/or tissue necrosis.

Best wishes with your upcoming operation.

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/Procedure_breastLiftAug.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 626 reviews

No smoking before surgery: first-hand OR second-hand

+1

Cigarettes contain nicotine and emit carbon monoxide and a variety of other unhealthy chemicals.  Although second-hand smoke is not as bad as doing the smoking yourself, it's still not good.  You should avoid smoking of any kind for at least two weeks--and preferably four or more--prior to breast lift surgery.

Exposure to cigarettes increases your risk of wound healing problems, infection, poor scarring, poor circulation to the breast skin and nipple, breathing problems after surgery, and blood clots.  If you're going to take the time and money to undergo a completely elective procedure, why not stack the odds of success in your favor?

Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Avoiding smoking or second hand smoke prior to surgery

+1

Although smoking is worse second hand smoke is bad as well prior to surgery do to the vasoconstrictive nature of the nicotine. You should avoid smoking and second hand smoke 4 weeks prior to surgery and 3 after surgery! Preferably not smoking at all!

 

 

 

Good Luck

Web reference: http://www.talroudnerplasticsurgery.com/breastlift.php

Coral Gables Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 75 reviews

Nicotine (even from second-hand smoke) is a potent vasoconstrictor and can cause dead skin or nipples!

+1

Nicotine is such a potent vasoconstrictor that even minimal exposure (such as second-hand smoke) can cause blood vessels to narrow and blood flow to reduce significantly. While this is bad enough for anyone who is not having surgery, a breast lift requires that skin flaps be elevated surgically, compromising the blood flow that keeps the skin and nipple/areola complexes alive. The decrease in available blood flow is further worsened by swelling that occurs with any operation. Excessive cold (such as from an ice bag) can add another form of reduced circulation. Throw in some nicotine and you have a recipe for disaster!

BTW, nicotine gum, spray, or patches are equally bad for circulation, though these do not contain the carbon monoxide that cigarette smoke does! Chantix and Zyban are OK.

DO NOT be around second hand smoke 2 weeks before and after surgery, or until healed. Best wishes and speedy recovery!

Web reference: http://mpsmn.com/breast-procedures/breast-lift

Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Second hand smoke

+1

It is best to avoid any contact with smoke, period. Second hand smoke while not as bad certainly can affect the healing.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Second hand smoke and breast lift

+1

Altho the risk is small, I would try to avoid it if at all possible.  Even second hand smoke can lead to the complications of nicotine.  The last thing you need from a cosmetic surgery is the complication of nipple areolar vascular compromise or delayed would healing.  Enjoy dinner and dancing instead and let him go to the casino with his friends.  You'll always be able to go after you're healed looking great!  Good luck, Dr. Schuster from Boca Raton.

Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Smoking and surgery

+1

Even second hand smoke can hurt your result and result in significant complications as noted as the other physicians that answered.

I also like to point out that even the nicotine patches, nicotine gum, and the like can hurt your result.  To minimize complication risk, minimize your exposure to any form of nicotine.

I hope this helps, good luck!

Cherry Hill Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Any Nicotine Exposure is Bad Before Breast Lift

+1

Hi there-

Any nicotine at all (whether from cigarettes, gum, patches, or even someone else's cigarette) may compromise the blood flow to the skin of your breasts and therefore your safety and happiness with your result.

Avoid it at all costs- this is elective surgery, right? It doesn't make sense to do or allow anything that might lower your chances of being happy or increase your chances of a problem.

Web reference: http://www.DrArmandoSoto.com

Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Smoking + Breast Lift Surgery = Pontential Healing Complications and a Dead Nipple

+1

Nicotine consumption (inhalation (smoking directly or second hand smoke), chewing or patches) result in long lasting blockage of blood vessels to the skin which can result in disastrous skin death after certain operations such as Facelift, Tummy Tuck, Breast Lift etc. 

I would strongly advise you against ANY exposure to nicotine as it may seriously compromise your result.

Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

You might also like...