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Is it Normal for a Doctor to Inject Me Once on Each Side for Crows Feet?

This new doctor did one tiny poke on each side!? In the past, I've had little injections near all the lines (5 or 6 on each side)? Did I go to the wrong doctor or is this how some Doctors inject Botox for crows feet??

Doctor Answers (21)

Botox/Dysport - 1 injection site versus 3

+2

Recently published a study in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology discussing our experience administering Botox through one injection point in the lateral periocular area (area around the side of your eye) being as effective as when delivered through three separate injection sites. There is less potential for pain and bruising this way. The important factor is the total number of units used, not necessarily how many injection points it is administered through. As long as your physician feels comfortable with his/her method of injecting (and is experienced in the procedure), there is really no "incorrect" way to do it.


Beverly Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Botox for crow's feet with one injection per side

+1

The number of injection sites and the number of units required depends on the individual patient.  Your doctor will examine your crow's feet and their movement and decide what would be best for you.  If you are not happy with the results after 12 days, return for re-assessment.

Martie Gidon, MD, FRCPC
Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

The proof of Botox is in the results

+1

You may get perfectly satisfactory results with a single Botox injection on each side for treatment of crow's feet lines.  Most experienced injectors use at least two or three injections per side to spread out the product and paralyze as much of the outer orbicularis muscle as possible.  The advantage of a single injection is less pain and lower risk of  bruising which is more common around the eyes.

If you don't get the results from a single injection that you have gotten with more injections, go back to the doctor and express your concerns. If you don't get a satisfactory answer or results, go somewhere else in the future.

James McMahan, MD
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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Crow's feet injections

+1

No one patient's anatomy is identical. Injection sites and number will vary with your individual features and  areas that need correction.  Any time you have a question about your treatment plan, I encourage you to speak up.  A patient's question and feedback are always welcome. 

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Number of injection sites for Botox

+1

If you are having your crow's feet area treated (sides of the eyes), this is usually performed with multiple (3-4) injection sites, with each injection delivering about 2 units of Botox. It is difficult to treat any area with just one single injection. Consult with a board certified plastic surgeon or dermatologist familiar with Botox injections if you have any further questions.

Best wishes,

Dr.Bruno

 

William Bruno, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 135 reviews

Individualized Botox

+1
  • Good question, Great results from Botox can be seen with a variety of injection patterns.  The most consistent results will likely come from the most consistent schedule and pattern for injection.
  •  Using one or three injection sites is less important than the technique and dosage to achieve the improvement of the appearance,
  • But without affecting the function of your eyelids. 
  • You are the best judge of your results, so just make a mental note of how this last Botox treatment worked compared to others.  Then, have an open discussion with your surgeon

Best Wishes

Travis T. Tollefson, MD, MPH
Sacramento Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Botox for Crow's Feet

+1

There is no one way to inject the crows feet. I prefer to do multiple injections points by spreading the skin to see the small veins and therby try to avoid hitting them which can cause bruising. The single point injection techniques can also work but the injector needs to make sure the injection is spread out along all the crow's feet and not just concentrated at one end or the other. As this area can easily be touched up you will be able to see if it worked or not and then get more if needed. 

Navinderdeep S. Nijher, MD
Ocala Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Is it Normal for a Doctor to Inject Me Once on Each Side for Crows Feet?

+1

I have used Botox to soften unwanted lines and wrinkles, including the Crow's Feet, for over 20 years and that's how I treat the Crow's feet and have done so for many years.  Other doctors still use multile needle sticks, but I use a single injection along the orbital rim under the Crow's Feet, on each side, for a great result.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Botox injection for crows feet

+1

It is true that every doctor may have slightly different technique. I typically inject along multiple foci on each side of the lateral orbit for crows fee.
 

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

It may be perfectly normal.

+1

Hello,

When a clinician injects Botox the amount of fluid injected will depend on the concentration of Botox mixed up.  If your physician used a higher concentration of Botox then a smaller injection is needed to give you the same number of units.  I would recommend asking your physician what number of units were placed into each of your crow's feet areas.  In your past it was possible that your other injectionist used a lower concentration of Botox so a larger number of low-volume injections were necessary to deliver the same total number of units. 

Good luck.

Dr. Shah

Manish H. Shah, MD, FACS
Denver Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.