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How long did your Botox headache last?

  • Debranne
  • Indianapolis IN
  • 6 years ago

I received 25 units for TMJ on 8/21 - a slight headache began that evening. The following morning (8/22), I had a full-blown headache. I took Tylenol and it seemed to help a little. Upon waking the next day (8/23) the headache again was full-blown, I took some more Tylenol, they are helping a little. How long will these headaches persist?

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is it common that after 6 weeks of getting injected with botox i feel a heaviness above my eyes ,and the heat or direct sunlight on my face causes a cramp in my forehead muscles?
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Not for long. Botox is injected into 31 sites around the head in a five-to-10-minute procedure. Botox blocks chemical changes on nerve endings thereby reducing migraine pain. Know more at: http://www.drfarella.com/botox-injections-for-migraines/
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Botox can also migrate from the injection site and cause major health problems to other parts of the human body. This side effect is rare but largely ignored in the medical community. The black box warning is there for a reason.
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Botox can also migrate from the injection site and cause major health problems to other parts of the human body. This side effect is rare but largely ignored in the medical community. The black box warning is there for a reason.
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I have a question. If true migraines cause zigzag lines and visual disturbances within the brain and blood vessels, how does paralyzing the muscles with botox or dysport cure true migraines? I can see it working on tension (muscle) headaches, but not on migraines. Does anyone know the answer to this? just curious.
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I can tell you from seeing my neurologist and having nerve decompression surgery, that the nerve blocks are considered the best for the pain of a headache. What is fairly common for those of us that have had the surgery, is now dealing with tightness in the neck. That is because we have had muscle tissue removed so the nerves can be freed so that blood flow can begin again. The tightness in my neck can be very tight to minimal. I take muscle relaxers to help deal with the tightness. I will tell you, that she is giving some patients who are willing to try, Botox in the neck. It is obviously used to calm the muscles in the neck. Since my nightmare story of Botox, I have chosen not to use Botox injections for my neck. I will also say that it is a very real possibility that if I did, there could be a real possibility of having headaches again due to the Botox. That is something I will never try ever again. The price is way too high.
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My headache from the botox in my forehead lasted about off and on for about 3 weeks. I spoke to my internist about it and he said that the botox may have hit a nerve which was causing the headaches. I also think that perhaps they came from the inability to move my eyebrows with expressions I would normally make but couldn't because of the botox and this was causing a strain. I know I do raise my eyebrows a lot normally, but never realized how much I did it until I couldn't. I will never do botox again. It also cause my eyelids to sag basically taking away any lid I had. This is gradually getting better but in the beginning I couldn't even put on my eyeliner without getting it everywhere because I had to lift the skin of my eyelid to put it on. I finally gave up and now after about 6 weeks I can use eyeliner again!
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My headache lasted for about 2 and a half weeks. I was actually thinking the same thing as you that maybe because I couldnt move those muscles it was causing a strain. So hard to say. I have friends who regularly get botox and they love it and for some of them it actually keeps them from ever getting headaches. I don't think I will try it again. It was agony for over 2 weeks. Agony.
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It appears the person that injected you with Botox touched a nerve which will explain the eyelid drooping. I suggest Either go back to the person that injected you and explain what has happened or never go back to that person again. Ensure that whoever administers Botox is a highly qualified Cosmetic practitioner not just some local beauty therapist. It is a great product to minimise the effects of aging however can be quite detrimental in the hands of an inexperienced person.

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I am right there with you. I got Botox Cosmetic for my forehead deep wrinkles and its been 6 days, and I still have an awful headache, taking plenty of advil, tylenol, etc. My doctor recommended an antihistamine, so I will try that shortly (when I can take a nap) but I have been missing appointments and haven't left the house much with the headache. One thing that helps is a prescription numbing cream 'Voltaren Gel' which takes the edge off....In 3 days if it not gone, I will call back, but its incapacitating me, awful, I will never get Botox again, although they say its better with more injections. I just can't afford to have this much down time from a headache. It like I can't get away from it....wish I could reverse it. If you are a red head, or tend to be a person that gets a lot of side effects, or are just sensitive in general...don't bother, this price of beauty is too much, I will take my wrinkles back.
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Allergan did tell me that headaches following Botox were not an uncommon problem.
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It is amazing to me to see how many people are dealing with this pain, and yet so many doctors don't have a clue as to what is happening. March 24th 2010 I began to have headaches. I have never suffered from migraines in my life. 4 days prior to the 24th, I tried Botox on my forehead. Dr said I might have a light headache, but should go away in about a day. It did, but then the 24th came and so did the pain. I suffered 24/7 level 10 pain for 9 1/2 months. After multiple MRI's, drugs, pain meds, hospital stays, my neurologist referred me to one in Houston. This lady knew exactly what was going on. I had Occipital Neuralgia. Nerve blocks were given and my head pain exploded even worse. However, that was the defining moment that we determined I needed nerve decompression surgery. I had surgery March 1, 2011 and I finally have my life back. I truly believe that the Botox was the trigger that put this all into motion. After much information, I have learned from my doctors that if you have occipital neuralgia and or trigeminal neuralgia, you have had some sort of trauma to the head. I had a car wreck in 2000. I wasn't seriously injured, but most definitely had a bad case of whiplash. They believe the accident caused the nerve damage, and that the Botox was just the trigger. I would suggest to everyone on this website to do some homework on this whole study. Interestingly, I have come to know 5 other people in my city of about 100,000 people that have had this exact same problem and have had the surgery. All successful I have to add. There is help, you just have to find the right people.
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I have a compressed nerve at C5-C6. I KNOW this is causing my headaches, but the doctors still insist it's migraine. I am in pain every day. What did your nerve decompression surgery involve? And what part of your upper body was it done on?
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My surgery was done on the lower base of my head and running down on the upper part of my neck. I actually have a cd of the surgery where you can see the nerves that are compressed through muscle tissue and scar tissue. The nerves are not cut, but they remove the tissue that is compressing the nerves so that blood can flow once again. When the nerve is compressed, it's flat and white, but when it is freed, it turns pink once again and is circular. Nerves take a very long time to heal from being damaged, so it's not a quick recovery. The information involving my story is quite lengthy from start to finish, but I can tell you that there are people being treated as migraine patients and that is not even remotely close to what is going on. If you have true migraine headaches, then there is a migraine drug that will stop the pain. The process to find that drug can be lengthy, but at least there is relief. My pain in my head was definitely not a migraine, and no pain killer or drug would stop the pain. I will say however, that before I had the surgery, I was taking Lyrica (350 mg), and it was the only medication that took my head pain from a good day (5 to 10 pain level) down to a 1-3 pain level. I would definitely recommend trying that over any other medication. I was also taking Hydrocodone with the Lyrica. After the surgery, I stopped the Hydrocodone within 3 weeks. I was able to stop the Lyrica after 7 months post surgery.
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How did they find that the nerves were compressed? Through the MRI? All my head MRI's are clear. The cervical MRI showed a "significant" compression of the nerve coming out of the left side, hence my left side shoulder, shoulder blade, neck pain and left side headaches I have been complaining about nonstop for the past 2+ years. I had to see someone in a pain clinic outside of my regular PCP at the Mayo to get the cervical MRI. They kept telling me the pain was migraine. Really? In my shoulder, arm and neck? I have tried so many meds without success. Nothing stops the pain. It comes and goes at will, on its own. Two and 1/2 years of this crap with it getting progressively worse, along with my continual dizziness. I even broke down and tried Cymbalta. That did nothing except make me extremely fatigued. Now I am again on a small dose of two anti-depressants because the docs believe those solve everything.
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For the best insight as to what my neurologist and surgeon are doing when it comes to head pain, you can go online and google Dr Pamela Blake on GMA (Good Morning America). They did a piece on her and Carlton Perry (plastic surgeon who actually performs the surgery) back a few years ago. It is a very insightful piece.
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Thanks - I am checking it out.
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Wow, your story sounds so similar to mine. I refuse the drugs though. Does your pain come and go? do you have any good days? I think mine could be a compressed nerve as well but it's on both sides of my upper cervical region. I pray to God daily to help me find a way out of this. I am an otherwise happy person! but these days bring me way down. I can so relate to what you are going through. Doctors don't really care, they just want you on drugs so you can stop bugging them. It's sad. (Not you personally but people suffering from chronic pain). :)
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Thanks for the info. I just looked at that piece and it actually sounds like something that I could benefit from. One would hope that finding a way to get that done and pay for it would be within reach.
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in what area of the US do you live and who did your surgery? If I may please politely ask.
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I live in Texas. My doctors are in Houston. Since having the surgery, I no longer have the head pain that I once did. I described my pain as if someone put a vice clamp around my entire head and was squeezing it tighter and tighter. The pain didn't come and go, it was constant 24/7. I knew it wasn't a migraine because I didn't have a lot of the symptoms that are associated with a migraine. I know, because my mother suffered from migraines for years, so I knew very well what they looked like. This surgery is recommended to people who have exhausted all other possibilities to get rid of the head pain and they fail. This surgery is fairly new. I believe they have been doing them for around 6 years. Insurance companies are not on board with paying for it since they say is still in the experimental phase. That is the biggest joke of all this. I have BCBS and it's amazing that they will pay for doctors visits, MRI's, hospital stays to try DHE, and drugs galore, but won't pay for a permanent solution. Word of this surgery is getting out, so hopefully they will get onboard.
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wow. I am happy that you are better. I have probably a few good days per month. I am not a big drug taker person and nobody would approve of any surgery for me until I've tried all the drugs (which I will never do because of the side effects). Glad that you feel better.
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I don't know where you live, but I can't encourage you enough to keep after seeking for the solution. If at all possible, get to Houston and see if you could get in to see Dr. Blake. Not everyone needs this surgery, but she would tell you that there is help and would not stop until you are pain free. There is a reason your head hurts, and you just haven't found the right person to tell you what it is.
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My pain does come and go, with no rhyme or reason. I also have neck ache/pain on both sides at the base of my neck and up over my left and right eyebrows - it varies. My headaches feel deep and like my head is going to explode from the inside out. My eyes hurt and sometimes it feels hard to focus them, like they are not working together. I get dizzy - not vertigo, just disequilibrium. No drugs have seemed to help. I have no migraine symptoms. But they call this migraine. I am calling Houston. I am in AZ, so it's not that far. I have vacation time coming in August. I am going to plan a visit if I can get in.
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My insurance has covered everything except Occipital Nerve Blocks. Says it's not a proven treatment for migraines. But I am convinced it's not migraine anyway. My medical file over the past two years is so thick, its disgusting. All for nothing, because I feel crappier than I ever did, yet all my tests tell them I am 'normal'.
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