How do you get your Invisalign trays out?

  • 3 years ago

I'm sure the struggles of this woman are all too familiar for most Invisalign wearers. What ways have you found to get them out more quickly or more discreetly?

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Hello! I am a registered dental assistant in San Francisco, CA. We have a lot of patients with Invisalign, and for a while, we gave them removal tools but they either did not work very well, or was too cumbersome. So, I created a modern, ergonomic removal tool called, thepultool! It fits in your standard aligner case, so it is easy to carry around. Check us out on instagram: thepultool or on our website: www.thepultool.com. Cheers! Jannet
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I start at the very back, and just use my finger nail over the edge to gently release the back 2 molars. Then I move forward, gently releasing tooth by tooth (some just pop right off as I don't have buttons on them). The teeth I have buttons on, I have to pull outwards slightly as I am pulling down to pop the tray over the button. It takes me about 2-4 seconds to get each tray out. The first 2-3 times was difficult and I got some sores under my finger nails but I've figured out those sweet spots now.
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Hello! I am a registered dental assistant in San Francisco, CA. We have a lot of patients with Invisalign, and for a while, we gave them removal tools but they either did not work very well, or was too cumbersome. So, I created a modern, ergonomic removal tool called, thepultool! It fits in your standard aligner case, so it is easy to carry around. Check us out on instagram: thepultool or on our website: thepultool.com. Cheers! Jannet
  • Reply
Hello! I am a registered dental assistant in San Francisco, CA. We have a lot of patients with Invisalign, and for a while, we gave them removal tools but they either did not work very well, or was too cumbersome. So, I created a modern, ergonomic removal tool called, thepultool! It fits in your standard aligner case, so it is easy to carry around. Check us out on instagram: thepultool or on our website: www.thepultool.com. Cheers! Jannet
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The invisalign trays are by design a bit tough to get out. That's because they need to tightly adhere to the teeth to get the desired tooth movements. However, it is generally the number of attachments that make it really tough to get the aligners out. If there are too many attachments overall, or in one area of your mouth, then you may struggle. As noted by Sandra06 below, if you are struggling to get them out with your fingers, then purchase a metal crochet hook. They are great because they are not sharp, but are small enough to fit over the edge of the tray. Good luck!
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Hello! I am a registered dental assistant in San Francisco, CA. We have a lot of patients with Invisalign, and for a while, we gave them removal tools but they either did not work very well, or was too cumbersome. So, I created a modern, ergonomic removal tool called, thepultool! It fits in your standard aligner case, so it is easy to carry around. Check us out on instagram: thepultool or on our website: www.thepultool.com. Cheers! Jannet
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From day one, my dentist gave me a metal crochet hook - in fact he gave me 2 (one for home and one for my bag). Ask your dentist. You place the hook under the tray and it easily lowers and you can pull the tray in and out. This was a godsend as I found it impossible to pull out with my soft nails. Regarding cleaning, I used liquid soap. I also purchase denture cleaning tablets and used this every other day to ensure no gems built up in the tray.
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Release them from the inside of your mouth not outside. Right thumb goes diagonally across to left/last inside tooth. Then reverse with left thumb. This will make you very happy.....Hope this works for you!
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Gosh--i cried my first few days. I have 12 buttons. My nails are so soft and short they are not an option. My dentist never gave me any advice. So I stole some plastic collar stays from my husband's dress shirts--thin flexible plastic with a slightly pointed end. It slides beautifully under the edge so I can pry it over the buttons. Works like a charm. I bought a denture cleaning box and fill it with diluted hydrogen peroxide. The collar stay and the trays go in during meals!
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Thank you...I am going to try this as I have no nails left! What a brilliant idea!!
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I am still on tray 1. The first few days I was almost in tears trying to pry them out...Seems to be better the second week getting them in and out. Anyone who is further along can advise -- am I getting better at it, or do the trays loosen up? I am wondering if I am going back to struggling when I get my second tray...
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I know exactly what you're going through. My orthodontist never told me how to get the trays out other than to use my fingers. It caused me an enormous amount of stress which didn't have to happen. What's wrong with these people?! Seriously, give patients the information that they need. I started using a popsicle stick to pry them off and it works perfectly. The trays are always tighter when you start them the first few days. I'm now toward the end of my treatment, thank goodness.
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My first 5 or so tray sets were very difficult to get in and out. There were times when I was almost to tears. It got much better for two reasons. First, I learned how to get them out with minimal discomfort, and second, as my teeth were becoming straighter the trays didn't have to stretch or contort as much to go on or off. I am now in trayset 33 out of 42 and the last several traysets have been downright easy. Hang in there and it will get better as yout teeth come in line.
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Like PixieDust2 stated, it does get easier. I just finished my treatment (after a little over a year). The first couple months I wanted to give up SO bad, but my husband was my biggest supporter. I can't believe a year has already gone by. I love the way my teeth look, and I'm weaning myself off wearing the retainers (I'm at about 16-18 hours a day now and it feels like 'freedom'). As your teeth adjust to each tray, they get easier to take in and out; however, I was warned that you can "stretch" them, so you do have to be careful about removing them...don't 'pull' them away from the teeth, but rather down from the teeth (or up, if you're doing the lower trays). And especially as my teeth got straighter, they became much easier to take off (less bumps and crowding). Good luck!! It really is worth it.
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did you have the buttons or attachments? my dentist said I had to pull mine "outward" before removing, to get them over the buttons. At first I was worried about breaking or stretching them...
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You need to find the "sweet spot" for getting them off. My upper retainers would only come off by pulling the left side from left to right. It took a while to get it. Then the bottom would only come from right to left. Use your fingernail to push up the bottom retainer on the very back tooth the retainer sits on.
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Hi, I'm on tray 2 of 31 so we're at same stage, more or less. I took 50 minutes to get the 2nd tray in and I was getting really stressed. I mistakingly thought that I would follow the usual method as I had done with tray 1. I was wrong and now need to start in the middle of the teeth, as opposed to starting one end and finishing the other. Weird as the change in trays 1 and 2 must be minimal. For those of you further down the line....do you struggle with the limited time that the trays are out - there barely seems enough time to ejoy a cuppa and to eat. Thanks all.
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Here's what works for me: To remove the top tray I curve my fingers and catch my fingernails along the top, outer edges of the tray, then gently pull straight down. Removing the top for me has always been easier than removing the bottom. To remove the bottom tray I insert my thumbs into my mouth on either side between the tray and my cheeks, and catch the lower, outer edges of the tray with my thumb nails. I then gently lift the back ends of the bottom tray up slightly off the back molars and then stabilize the uplifted back ends of the tray with the back edges of my tongue. I then catch my thumb nails under the lower, outer edges of the tray in front of the canines and push upward. This pops the tray out. For me, getting the lower tray in is harder than getting it out. Because there is so much crowding in my lower jaw, because the incisors are pointed backward (this is being corrected), and because there are pesky knobs on 6 of the lower teeth, the fit of the trays has been very tight. It's a bit of a "yowie" every time a new trayset goes in on the lowers because the tray resists and then suddenly snaps in with brute force. But it certainly does get easier every time, and there has been improvement in both uppers and lowers as the alignments approach normal. It has been well worth the effort--in fact, it has all become rather routine.
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I feel so bad for this woman in the video!! Why are the assistants not helping her more instead of saying she will just get used to it? The first day I received my aligners, my assistant was great, giving me tips. She had me hold a mirror while she removed them the first couple of times, then it was my turn. She taught me to loosen up both back sides first, then work around the front. I've never torn my trays. I agree with the above statement, that when I get to the front, I reach for my canine and that pops them right off. It never takes me more than 10 seconds to pop them out. The other thing I noticed in the video is she was reaching across her mouth with the opposite hand. I would never be able to get them out that way. I use my right hand to work on the right side and vice versa on the left. The first two days on a new tray for me are the tightest by the middle to end of the week they just pop right out. My ortho gave me an outie tool (you can get them on Amazon) but I've never had to use it. Don't give up, the more you do it the easier it gets.
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I feel really bad, lol, I got my attachments right before having my first set of trays put on, and I had no difficulty removing them at all that first time, or at all since (knock on wood).
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I've had my Invisalign for 5 months now and I can tell you, just buy a size B metal crochet hook. I use this for the first few days of each new set, or, if I just don't want to stick my fingers in my mouth. It works great!
And here's a tip for cleaning: using a firm toothbrush, clean the trays with dishwashing liquid, rinsing thoroughly after of course!
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Well, I'm on my 7th set of trays, it's easier now to get them in and out, I ordered to hook of off amizon which is brilliant when u 1st put a new set inn. (the hook is metal and small, best purchase ever) the only thing is I'm still splitting the trays, but my teeth are moving so I'm a happy chicken ;) x
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Hey Sarah, I've just started my 3rd set of trays and am having the same issue in getting them out. I've heard lots of people mention the tool to help get the retainers out, was just wondering if you had a link to the one you purchased?

Thanks
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I've had my Invisalign trays for three days and find them very hard to remove. The plastic tools that the ortho provided aren't strong enough; they just bend. The only thing that has really worked is a small crochet hook. I'm going to buy an even smaller one (size B). Can't wait until this is easier!
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Sarah~ don't give up (or lose the will to live:)! I'm on my 16th set of trays and I only have 3 more to go. I'm so happy with the results!! Getting them off the attachments is a challenge. I still just loosen them with my finger nails. I have also split mine a few times. But the whole experience has been so worth it!!! As for cleaning, I am a fanatic when it comes to keeping my mouth clean!! I bought some retainer bright (just google it) and it does an amazing job of keeping my trays clean! I'm kind of addicted to having a clean mouth...haha!!:) Hang in there!!!
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