Can you have alarplasty and cartilage (from the nose) added to the tip of your nose without being put completely under?

Can you have alarplasty and cartilage (from the nose) added to the tip of your nose without being put completely under?

Doctor Answers 12

Rhinoplasty and local anesthesia

Yes it is possible to apply cartilage into the nasal tip and also performed alar plasty without going to sleep.  New


Dr. J

Bedminster Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 88 reviews

Can you have alarplasty and cartilage (from the nose) added to the tip of your nose without being put completely under?

Thank you for your question. If you are unhappy with the look of your nose, you think that you would be much happier after a rhinoplasty operation; if you had an accident and the shape of your nose got worsened after this accident; then you can be a good candidate for rhinoplasty operation. It is a well-known fact that individuals with feeling themselves beautiful have higher self-esteem. Therefore; if the look or functionality of your nose bothers you, you can get benefit from a rhinoplasty operation

Rhinoplasty via local anesthesia

Yes, rhinoplasty may be performed via local anesthesia. Most plastic surgeons suggest having general anesthesia for complete or complex rhinoplasty. Moving cartilage from inside the nose (septum) to modify the nasal tip, however, is generally not performed via local anesthesia. The decision for the type of anesthesia depends on the complexity of the surgery, patient preference, and surgeon preference. If you haven't already, then speak with a rhinoplasty specialist to help determine appropriate options for you.


Dr. Chaboki

Houtan Chaboki, MD
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 77 reviews

Local Anesthesia Rhinoplasty

It is difficult to say if this surgery can be done without being able to see you in person, to determine the exact amount of work that needs to be done.  The short answer is yes, a limited rhinoplasty can be done under local anesthesia.  In the case where more work is needed, there is bleeding risk and risk of danger to the airway.  In those cases general anesthesia is preferred.

Best of Luck

Dr Rodman

Regina Rodman, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Tip plasty and cartilage graft without general anesthesia

It is theoretically possible but not recommended.

With no general anesthesia, heavy sedation and local anesthesia is used; the experience is not as safe as general anesthesia, where there is complete control of the airway. If no sedation is used, the local anesthesia is extremely unpleasant, with the patient moving, making things worse.

Dennis Barek, MD
Great Neck Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Tip Rhinoplasty With Local Anesthesia

Yes, rhinoplasty can be done under local if that is desired. With anesthesia being a very safe procedure these days only a few choose this method. Transferring cartilage to the nasal tip to obtain better definition and projection is common and does not change no matter which type of anesthesia is chosen.

Ira D. Papel, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Tip rhinoplasty

Hello and thank you for your question. Tip rhinoplasty should be done under general anesthesia for optimal results.  Harvesting cartilage grafts and placing them in the tip requires precision and great technique.  Make sure you specifically look at before and after pictures of real patients who have had this surgery performed by your surgeon and not just a computer animation system. The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 67 reviews

Tip rhinoplasty

I think that a simple alarplasty can be done with local only, but if you plan on having tip work done, then you probably are best to have sedation too.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Alar rim surgery


I prefer not to alter the shape of the nostril at the same time as doing tip surgery. I wait until the tip has settled and presented itself to the point that I feel comfortable taking this step. Why do I stage this? First of all it is not reversible so if one takes this step it must be done as precisely as possible. Secondly, when I change the projection, orientation and shape of the nasal tip it will change the shape of the nostril in a way that is unpredictable which harkens back to my first point. Finally it is a patient friendly step, can easily be done under straight local, with minimal bruising, swelling and post op discomfort. As always see a surgical specialist that does "only faces" and has great photos. Good luck and see the video.

M. Sean Freeman, MD
Charlotte Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Nose procedure and anesthesia type

Dear Donica,

    Alarplasty can be done under local anesthesia, though the tolerance for the needle injection pain is personal. The majority of the patients tolerate the local anesthesia , but some request sedation. 

      The harvesting of the septal cartilage for nasal tip graft is a different story. When that procedure is contemplated in my surgery center, general anesthesia is required, because it is too painful to perform under local anesthesia , which might also limit the amount of cartilage necessary to harvest. 

   Another option for harvesting cartilage is from the ear, and that technique can be performed under local anesthesia, with the understanding that ear and nose tip  injection with local anesthesia is quite sensitive.

       Always, consult with experienced board certified plastic surgeons who operate in accredited surgery center for your safety. Most importantly, check the before and after pictures , to make sure that they are numerous, consistent and attractive .

                                 Best of luck,

                                                              Dr Widder

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.