4 Weeks post op. When will my Labiaplasty swelling go down?

I had labiaplasty almost 4 weeks ago. It only looks slightly better than before i had the surgery. Will the swelling go down more and will it look different in another month or so?

Doctor Answers 6

Swelling post labiaplasty

Any time prior to a few months is too soon to expect edema to resolve, worry that it will not or know your final result. Labia often swell quickly and asymmetrically early on for the first 2-3 days and varies widely from patient to patient. Pain is variable from patient to patient. Sitz baths in warm water though good for cleaning and possible infection prevention can cause increased swelling. It can last several weeks to months and vary from day to day if you overdo it, eat a salty meal. Things you can try for early edema resolution: Low salt diet, arnica, bromelain, Ibuprofen. You should have a good idea of your final appearance by 3 months. I tell my patients, for most you are 85% of the way to your final result in about 3 months the rest takes up to a year.
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Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 110 reviews

Swelling after labiaplasty

Thank you for your question. Labiaplasty swelling can be very intense, especially if accompanied by bruising or hematoma. The labial tissue can expand quite a bit compared to other areas of the body, and it is not uncommon for one side to swell more than the other. I generally tell my patients that it will be weeks of swelling, with each week getting better than the previous. I ask them to avoid anything that can induce swelling such as strenuous activity or friction on the labia for upto six weeks. I also recommend that they keep the labia fairly lubricated (e.g. vaseline or aquafor) during the initial couple weeks when the swelling is most intense. The end results should be fairly obvious around the six week, and there can be intermittent swelling due to over activity or too much friction for another six weeks.

Persistent swelling after labioplasty

Swelling after labiaplasty can last for 2-3 months.  So it is not unusual that you are still noticing some swelling.  I would recommend frequent follow-ups with your surgeon to make sure that there are no other issues that are creating the swelling.  Otherwise it is important to be patient.

Usha Rajagopal, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Labiaplasty swelling

Swelling after a labiaplasty can be persistent for a few months.  You have to be patient and allow the area to heal before getting too worried. If you have concerns, you should ask your surgeon.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Swelling after 4 weeks

Usually, about 80% of the swelling is gone at 6 weeks.  At that time, you should get a reasonable idea of your result.  If you are dissatisfied after about 4 months, then a revision should be considered after 5-6 months.  You need to control your anxiety and wait. The reconstruction is more difficult than a primary labiaplasty and should be done by a plastic surgeon with extensive experience in labia reconstruction.  You may need various reconstructive techniques to give you a good appearance, but this won't be known until all the swelling is gone.You only get one good chance to reconstruct you, so be patient and ask a lot of questions.

Gary J. Alter, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Labiaplasty surgery in Los Angeles and Santa Monica

Our office specializes in labiaplasty surgery and labiaplasty revision surgery. Swelling is a normal part of recovery and may take weeks to months. Follow up with your surgeon frequently to rule out any other reasons for persistent swelling.

Raffy Karamanoukian MD FACS
Los Angeles

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.