2 Weeks Post Op Full Tummy Tuck, Breast Lift and Breast Augmentation and Experiencing Searing Leg Pain when Walking?

Hi. I am 31 and am experiencing what I would describe as stabbing pain in the outer part of my left thigh whenever I walk. It started 2 days ago. My leg is not swollen and I do not have a fever. I was very active before the surgery and since the surgery I have been laying around a lot. I have been more active recently Could this be a sign of a blood clot or DVT? I do not see my plastic surgeon until Tuesday. Should I go see my primary physician tomorrow so I don't have to wait until Tuesday?

Doctor Answers 5

Severe leg pain 2 weeks after tummy tuck

Thank you for asking about your pain 2 weeks after your tummy tuck and breast lift.

  1. Your pain is probably from pressure on the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, a condition called meralgia. A common cause is tight clothing - e.g. a surgical garment. Loosen your tummy tuck garment. 
  2. Blood clots in the legs do not cause pain here.
  3. If pain does not improve with loosened clothing, call both your surgeon and your primary care doctor - the cause needs to be detected and treated. Best wishes.

Thigh pain is not a sign of a DVT

Stabbing pain of the upper outer thigh is not indicative of a DVT.  Without an examination it is difficult to diagnose your exact problem.  If it persists you should be seen as soon as possible.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Uncommon to have this type of pain

Thanks for your question. The absence of fever and swelling is good. You should have this evaluated. It could be with your position following the TT that you have some nerve compression. This could simply be an inflamed disc and likely would be responsive to steroids. I would start with your PS and they can help you with the work up. Best of Luck!

M. Scott Haydon, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Healing and Pain 2 Weeks After a Mommy Makeover

The Mommy Makeover is a combination of procedures to bring a woman’s body back to the way she looked prior to pregnancy. Most commonly some variation of a #TummyTuck and #BreastSurgery are performed. Additional procedures can include liposuction, umbilical hernia repair.  The most common #breastprocedures include #mastopexy or #breastlift, #breastaugmentation, or #breastreduction.    

Healing after a  #tummytuck will require time. Some patients are out of bed and walking the night of surgery and every hour while awake. I allow my patients to return to work at one to two weeks with 14 days preferred.  However, no lifting or straining.  At three weeks, increased level of activity and full with no restrictions, at 6 weeks. #MummyTummy is a term given to modified tummy tucks which can use liposuction and skin tightening with radiofrequency such Vanquish, Vela3, thermage, thermiRF and others.  The actual fat contouring can be done non-surgically as well with #UltraShape or Cool-Sculpting. Also some severe scars can be treated with re-excision, laser, kenalog/5-FU injections, creams, silicone strips and other methods to reduce and improve healing. Additionally, scar therapy with scar maturation products (e.g. BioCorneum or Embrace) are suggested for managing scars. However, we recommend you wait to use scar improving products until a few weeks following your surgery. 
As I advise my patients, if your work keeps you sedentary, you may return whenever you feel up to it. If your work is strenuous, wait until your work activity does not cause any superficial pain. 
If you have concerns about your healing, or pain that you question to be unusual, it is important to call your plastic surgeon to discuss these further asked to be examined.

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 94 reviews

Searing leg pain after mommy makeover

From your description, it sounds like nerve pain.  However, you should be seen by your plastic surgeon to make sure.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.