Stitches after labiaplasty?

Hi I had my labiaplasty surgery done on the 18th of May 2016 (20 days ago). Two days ago, in the toilet, one of my dissolvable stitches got removed while I was using the toilet paper. My healing is going well and I've no swelling, but I've some insane itching at times, especially when I go to the toilet. I've now stopped using the ointments my gynaecologist have me to use for 2 weeks. I'm only worried about the stitch that got removed two days ago.

Doctor Answers 10

One stitch does not a labiaplasty make

Don't worry about just one stitch. The itching worries me though. Yeast infection? Call your doc and see if you can't get a dose of diflucan to make sure that you get treated properly.

Stitches and Labiaplasty

The part of the absorbable sutures beneath the skin are broken down by your body, but the part on top doesn't. So that's why the knot was probably just sitting there not anchored strongly to the deeper tissues. When the toilet paper caught the knot, off it went. 

Itching is part of the healing process, and it will improve.

Share your concerns with your surgeon, since that's the best person from whom to get the best advice.

For more information about labiaplasty, click on the link below.

All the best.

Heather J. Furnas, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

When should my labiaplasty stitches come out?

No Worries!  How soon the sutures fall out depend on the type and caliber of the sutures utilized, and frequently they come out in 2-4 weeks. In my labiaplasties, in order not to have permanent scarring and "suture tracks" I put in thin but strong sutures well under the skin which very well hold everything together, allowing me to utilize very small, non-reactive and rapidly dissolving sutures ("5-0 Vicryl Rapide") which actually fall out in 10-14 days but cause no scarring and the incision remains strong because of the stitches used UNDER the skin.

If larger caliber and long-acting sutures (especially "3-0" and sometimes "4-0" delayed absorbable sutures like PDS, Monocril, and Vicryl) are used through-and-through the skin, and stay in over 3 weeks, they can cause distortion, "pebbling" and permanent "suture tracks..."

As for itching, I give all my patients a cannister of Dermaplast spray to take home with them; this helps a lot with "suture itching. (And of course, since I use rapidly absorbing sutures on the skin edges, long-term itching usually isn't a problem...) The antihistamine medication Hydroxizine 25 mg also helps a lot with itching.

Best,

Michael P Goodman, MD
Davis, CA, /USA

Sutures falling outI

Thank you for your post in question. It is not unusual for sutures to sometimes fall off prematurely. Most of us close the incision with multiple layers thereby decreasing the risk for wound separation even with one or several sutures falling out.
I would follow up with your surgeon to make sure that the looks okay

Insane itching from sutures...ask to have them removed!

Hello Sam,

It's not unusual for sutures to fall away as they dissolve. You should follow-up with your surgeon and see if you've healed sufficiently to remove the bothersome sutures. Depending on the technique these can be removed early, in fact we remove sutures in my Center between post-op day 5-7. The result is a better aesthetic result and more comfortable and thus happier patients.

Best of luck,

Oscar A. Aguirre, MD
Denver Urogynecologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Stitches after labiaplasty?

Thank you for your question and I am sorry that this has caused you to worry.  In most cases of a labiaplasty there are a number of sutures used to maintain the edges of your skin closed until your body fully heals. In most cases these sutures are absorbable and will weaken, break, and fall from the incision in the first few weeks after surgery.  Assuming you have not seen a significant change in the appearance of your labiaplasty all is likely well, but if you have any concerns see your surgeon for an in-person evaluation.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Stitches dissolve and fall out. That's what stitches do.

Unless your labiaplasty was held together by a single stitch, you have nothing to worry about. Most surgeons use multiple stitches in multiple layers to give strength to labiaplasty scars while they heal. All of these stitches will either dissolve or fall out.

Dissolving sutures after labiaplasty

Hi. Most surgeons would use dissolving sutures, which usually fall out about 3 weeks post op and this should be fine, if deeper sutures were used to support the tissues. Itching can be from normal healing, irritant sutures, or occasionally a yeast infection, so if any doubt, it is best to consult with your doctor.

Paul Jason Skoll, MBChB, FRCS, FCS (SA) Plast
South Africa Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Stitches after labiaplasty

Usually by 20 days the sutures I use will have dissolved because the tissue heals quickly but is still fragile. It of course depends on the technique used to determine if this is ok. The only way to know this is to call your doctor and ask if it is safe that the suture came out now. However, if the tissue didn't open up it usually will be fine, just be careful with the toilet paper and try not to pull on the tissue to look at the incision.  

W. John Bull, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Stitches after labiaplasty?

Three weeks after a labiaplasty, it is not unusual for some absorbable stitches to come loose or come out.  Even some non-absorbable stitches may untie around this time.  Take a close look at the incision line with a mirror to see if there are any open areas.  If you can't tell, call your surgeon to be evaluated.
Itching around this time is fairly normal as well.  Once again, evaluate the surgical area with a mirror and if there is any drainage, redness, or anything else that looks abnormal, see your surgeon soon.

David F. Klein, MD
Concord Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.