Moderate ptosis / grade 2 ptosis. What uplift do you suggest to your patients? (photos)

I have seen two ps bother agree on moderate ptosis / grade 2 ptosis. First one says just nipple uplift and other says full anchor lift. Both agree high profile round 375cc implant. What would you suggest if I was your patient. (I'm 26 126lb and 5"4. With two children not breastfed?)

Doctor Answers 3

Type of Breast Lift with Augmentation

No real advice can be given without an exam. However, "moderate" or especially Grade 2 ptosis can never be corrected with a periareolar lift. "Nipple lift" may or may not indicate this. It is possible that he meant  simply that the nipple needed to be elevated and would use a vertical lift. As far as an "anchor lift," I have not done this in connection with an augmentation in over 30 years. This should be especially true when you are not a grade 3.

Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Ptosis and breast augmentation

It is difficult to be sure from one photograph, you do appear to have a minor degree of ptosis, but that does not automatically mean that you have to have an uplift. It very much depends on what sort of result you are looking for and this can only really be established at a consultation. I use 3-D imaging to assess and measure patients, but also to run simulations so that women can see what each of the options can deliver. I would suggest you make an appointment with a reputable surgeon in your area, who can offer this service and see if this helps you make your mind up. Best of luck

How much lift needed

It is difficult to tell from a single picture with no exam.  The greater the amount of ptosis, the more incisions that are needed to complete the lift.  It will depend on how "deflated" your breast is as the appearance will change greatly once the implant is placed.  I would think you should be prepared for a vertical or standard lift.

David A. Lickstein, MD
Palm Beach Gardens Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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