How long after finishing breastfeeding can I go for augmentation?

Doctor Answers 5

Breastfeeding and breast augmentation

It is recommended to wait for about six months after breastfeeding to make sure that your breasts have settled to normal size and shape. This would also reduce the chance of infection from milk ducts in your breasts.

London Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Breast feeding

Most surgeons recommend waiting 4-6 months after ceasing breast feeding which allows adequate time for your breast to settle and less chance of infection from residual bacteria in milk ducts

Breast Augmentation/Breast Implants/Anatomic Gummy Bear Implants/ Silicone Implants/Breast Implant Revision

I appreciate your question.

I would recommend that you wait 6-12 months after you finish breast feeding prior to undergoing elective surgery.  This will allow your body adequate time to heal and recover as well as your hormones to balance out.

The best way to assess and give true advice would be an in-person exam.

Please see a board-certified plastic surgeon that specializes in aesthetic and restorative breast surgery.

Best of luck!

Dr. Schwartz

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon



How long after finishing breastfeeding can I go for augmentation?

 It will be in your best interests to wait 3 to 6 months after you have stopped breast-feeding, before undergoing any breast surgery.  Your chosen plastic surgeon will be able to provide you with more precise guidance after physical examination.

Best wishes.

Breast augmentation

Thank you for your question.  In our practice we advise patients to have finished breast feeding for at least three months before scheduling a consultation.

With kind regards,
Lane F. Smith, M.D., F.A.A.C.S., F.A.O.H.N.S., F.A.B.F.P.R.S.
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon

Lane Smith, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.