Day 8 post BA and my breasts haven't dropped at all yet. (Photo)

Still very high 8days post op. Also rock hard in the mornings. Is this normal? Also I had quite big implants, 500cc does bigger implants take longer to drop because of the size? Also, because it's mainly my own Brest tissue at the bottom of my breasts due to them nkt dropping, the bottoms aren't verb pronounced like the top, when they drop, will the bottom fill out more and become a little more te pronounced from my waist?

Doctor Answers 10

Day 8 post BA

At this point you are early in the healing process. Your implants will continue to settle and soften with time. Follow up with your surgeon as directed.


Regards,


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 457 reviews

Day 8 post BA and my breasts haven't dropped at all yet.

It is too early post-op to expect your breast implants to settle. Give it time and stay in contact with your Plastic Surgeon and his/her office

Thomas Trevisani, Sr., MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 63 reviews

High breasts early after breast augmentation

It is normal to have a high, tight look one week after surgery . It can take up to three months for everything to settle and drop. Keep up your postop visits and follow your surgeon's instructions. Best wishes 

Francisco Canales, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Give it time.

It is very normal for breasts to be high and tight this soon after surgery, especially if you had very small breasts to begin with. You just recently had surgery and it is still too soon to see any noticeable results. The skin needs time to stretch to accommodate the new implants and settle into place. Most implants "drop" within 2-3 months following surgery but everyone is different and some people can take up to a year before the implants settle into their permanent position. The lower pole should fill up more after they drop. Give it time and be patient and the shape and size will improve over time. Check with your surgeon to determine their recommendations.

Michael L. Workman, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Waiting for Breast Implants to Drop after Breast Augmentation #breastaugmentation

  • 8 days after a breast augmentation is not very much time at all, as far as healing is concerned!
  • It will take a few MONTHS before you see your final results.
  • And yes, depending on the size of your breast skin envelope to begin with, it can take longer to see your results if you have large implants. 
  • With time, your implants will stretch the lower pole skin of your breasts and the implants will settle into place.  The shape of your breasts will definitely change over time, and the implants will soften up as well!
  • Try to be patient, and you may be very happy with your final results!
  • Thanks for sharing!

Joshua Cooper, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

8 days after breast augmentation and implants have not dropped

Breast implants don't begin to visibly start dropping for at least 2 to 3 weeks after the surgery.They will continue to slowly settle/drop for several months. Follow the instructions that have been given to you by your doctor, be patient and enjoy your new look.

Jeffrey K. Scott, MD
Sarasota Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Implants dropping.

Cant tell. The photos are not clear.  However it is too soon. Give this more time. Be patient.
Dr Vasisht
South Shore Plastic Surgery

Bhupesh Vasisht, MD
Voorhees Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Day 8 post BA and my breasts haven't dropped at all yet.

Please relax-it can take 8-12 weeks for implants to drop. See your plastic surgeon and ask for instructions on breast implant displacement exercisies.

Way too early!

Implants will drop later in most patients. Not at 8 days! With bigger breast implants and tigth skin it will take longer than average. Your plastic surgeon is the best resource as far as monitoring your progress. Congratulations and best wishes! Dr. Aldo

Aldo Guerra, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 201 reviews

Dropping of implants

Generally speaking, especially early in the post-operative phase of healing, it is not uncommon to have one or both implants appear to be high up by the clavicle. Although the “pocket” may be made correctly, the implant may not have access to the bottom for several reasons. If the overlying muscle or skin is tight, this will move the implant to the path of least resistance which is up and towards the underarm where there is little or no pressure. As the pressure relaxes, the implant will drop down to the bottom. Smooth implants, because their surface is slippery, may move faster downward than a textured implant with its rough surface. Because these variables mentioned above can be different for each side, it's not uncommon that one side will drop faster to the bottom of the pocket than the other. Similarly, sometimes one breast will swell more than the other or be more painful than the other early in the postoperative phase. After the first month or two, usually things will even out. It wouldn't be, in my practice, until four months or so has passed that I would entertain going back to the operating room to “touch up” the location of the breast implant in the pocket. Sometimes specialized bras or straps as well as massage and stretching protocols may be helpful in allowing this process to happen more quickly. Each plastic surgeon will have different thoughts on what the best protocol is for the patient. Your operating plastic surgeon will be your best resource to have this information passed on to you. I recommend that you faithfully follow up and follow the instructions of your chosen plastic surgeon. Congratulations on your surgery, and good luck on an uneventful recovery.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.