Uneven labia minora after surgery, can I get skin added to the thin labia or trimmed down? (photos)

I had labiaplasty &it's uneven. At least b4 it was actually symmetrical. The surgeon took off too much on the right labia&took less off the other. This makes it look like one labia is covering the other. Id liketo have symmetrical labia again.he refused to do a clitoral hood reduction as apparently my clitoris would be exposed (need a clitorplexy but this is impossible to find in the U.K.)Can I get skin added to the thin labia?Or get the other trimmed down? Idon't like the scalloped look I have

Doctor Answers 12

Excessive trimming

has left you with a deficient R side but if you like that side better, it is easier to trim the left more to match it rather than trying to build up your deficient side.  So choose what you like best and find an experience surgeon who can do this for you.  And you could benefit from a hood reduction as well and your surgeon should be able to inform you about the different ways we go about doing this.  Best wishes in getting the results you desire.

Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Labiplasty Revision and Clitoral Hood

Thank you for your question and sharing your photographs. I understand your concerns.  The suture line of the labia can be revised. In regards to the clitoral hood, a physical examination would need to be performed to better evaluate your condition.  Surgeons in the United States do perform clitoral hood reduction.  I would recommend finding an experienced cosmetic genital surgeon, which include Cosmetic Urologists, even if it involves traveling. The surgeon should be able to discuss the options with you based on your individual findings.  Best of luck.

Jeffrey S. Palmer, MD, FACS, FAAP (Cosmetic and Reconstructive Urologist -- Cleveland, Ohio)

Jeffrey S. Palmer, MD, FACS, FAAP
Cleveland Urologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Uneven labia minora after surgery, can I get skin added to the thin labia or trimmed down?

Thank you for sharing your question and photographs.  I see your area of concern and would recommend having a revision procedure performed by a labiaplasty surgeon in order to maximize your outcome. You can have the larger, scalloped side reduced to better approximate your other labia while you would also benefit from a clitoral hood reduction to leave a smooth, tapering appearance.  Hope this helps.

Nelson Castillo, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Labia reconstruction

As the inventor and innovator of the wedge technique in 1994, I reconstruct many women who have had labia reductions by other surgeons, both wedge and trimming techniques. The reconstruction technique depends on the deformity. However, no attempt to revise your labia should be done until you are at least five months after your past procedure as your appearance will improve, and the swelling will be less. You need to control your anxiety and wait. The reconstruction is more difficult than a primary labiaplasty and should be done by a plastic surgeon with extensive experience in labia reconstruction. I published the first and most extensive paper on labia reconstruction in the prestigious journal "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery" about two years ago. You will need various reconstructive techniques to give you a good appearance,. I recommend clitoral hood flaps to reconstruct your labia since you have  remaining clitoral hood. I invented this procedure about ten years ago and have done it at least 50 times with excellent result.  In addition, I can do a clitoropexy in which the clitoris is pushed closer to the pubic bone and the width, thickness, length, and protuberance of the clitoral hood can be decreased.  I also invented this procedure and have done it over 250 times over the last 12 years.  You only get one good chance to reconstruct you, so be patient and ask a lot of questions.

Gary J. Alter, M.D. 

Beverly Hills, CA - Manhattan, NYC

Gary J. Alter, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Yes, your labiaplasty can be revised

The scalloped edges can be trimmed down and the two sides can be made more symmetrical. Scalloping is usually the result of crude suture technique.

Yet another "botched labiaplasty" (aka "Avoidable Unintended Female Genital Mutilation."

So that your hood doesn't stick out like a little penis, you will need at the least a carefully designed, artistically performed clitoral hood reduction by an experienced female genital plastic/cosmetic surgeon. As for the over-resected labum, there is nothing to do re: "bulking it up..." The only way to "smoothe" the left labum would be via "re-surfacing" with either laser of RF energy. There are a small number of surgeons doing this in the U.S. Your best bet in the U.K. is Dr. Alexandros Bader MD who has offices in Athens, Dubai, and London. I know there's a good doc in Belgium, but forgot name. I'm sure there are a couple others. Or you can fly to the U.S. Do not go back to your original surgeon.

Best wishes,

Michael P Goodman, MD

Davis, CA, USA

Uneven labia minora after surgery, can I get skin added to the thin labia or trimmed down?

Revision after labiaplasty in your case would be possible as it does appear that the left labia minora and clitoral hood are still enlarged. The procedure would entail removing tissue in those areas to create a more natural and symmetric appearance. Finding a surgeon who specializes in this type of procedure and who is able to address your concerns is very important. Unfortunately it sounds like this may require seeing a physician located elsewhere. If you are willing to travel either in your area or out of the country, there are many specialized surgeons who would be able to provide you with the outcomes you desire.

Uneven labia minora after surgery, can I add skin to the thin labia or trim?

Thank you for your question and photos. Based on the photos, you had a trim labiaplasty with two very common complications seen with this technique. One, over resection which you have on the right and two, no treatment of the clitoral hood. This is poor technique from a surgeon who is not trained well to address and create normal anatomical results in this area. My surgical approach to your condition would be a clitoral hood flap to reconstruct the labia on the right and a clitoral hood reduction. The less surgery you have done, the better, since you can't afford another complication in this delicate area. See a board certified plastic surgeon or gynecologist experienced in these reconstructive flap procedures. I'm not going to embark on scare tactics that were displayed in other posts. Good luck.

Trim and Hood reduction

thank you for your question. Looking at your photos, I recommend you have the labia trimmed to achieve better symmetry, realizing nothing is ever completely symmetric. More importantly, a clitoral hood reduction needs to be performed and it will give you a more even, sleek, top to bottom look. Best wishes. 

Dr Poucher

Another botched labiaplasty...Assymetric, top heavy, etc.

Thank you for sharing your photos. I am very sorry about your experience and poor results. You should have listened to your gut when you asked for a hood reduction and searched for the best surgeon the first time.

Your labia minora have been nearly completely amputated and done so unevenly without any attention to your large, ptotic prepuce (hood). The good news is you can undergo a revision to achieve a symmetric and natural appearance. However, you will need to travel. Please see link below regarding information for traveling patients who travel from outside of the state and country to have their surgery. Be sure to do your research in choosing the best surgeon for your revision.

Best of luck,

Oscar A. Aguirre, MD
Aguirre Specialty Care - Pelvic Surgery & Intimate Aesthetics®

Oscar A. Aguirre, MD
Denver Urogynecologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.