Someone looking for revisional rhino - How long would you make them wait after the primary surgery?

Imagine there's no functional issues. And even cosmetically nothing terribly wrong. Someone looking for slightest change. Would 5 to 6 months after primary be a long enough gap? Thanks in advance.

Doctor Answers 6

Swelling after rhinoplasty

Depending on the problematic issues at hand, waiting a minimum of 6-9 months is reasonable after nose surgery.  Typically, swelling at the tip of the nose take a year or longer to resolve entirely; if an area of concern is located here, waiting longer is prudent, as time allows swelling to resolve and scar tissue to soften.

Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

How long for revision rhinoplasty?

Thank you for your question. Most plastic surgeons will wait from 9-12 months following the initial procedure to allow for completion of healing. The edema (tissue swelling) following rhinoplasty tends to persist far longer than in other cosmetic procedures. By waiting the requisite amount of time, we can get a much clearer pre-surgical plan before attempted revision.

Michael F. Bohley, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

When to do revision rhinoplasty

The most general answer would be to give as much time for your nose to heal.  Healing changes can continue to occur many years after primary surgery.  

There are occasions when you can revise earlier.  

If you feel your functional, breathing, and cosmetic results are mostly satisfactory, I would recommend waiting.

You may consider temporary filler into the area.  Return back to your surgeon to discuss these issues.

Ernest Robinson, MD
Aliso Viejo Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Revision rhinoplasty at one year

 It takes one year for the entire process of maturation of scar tissue and resolution of edema  in the tip of the nose, therefore its best wait at least one year for the entire phases of healing to be completed before embarking on another rhinoplasty procedure

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

How long before revision rhinoplasty?

Hi there, great question!  It really depends on what you are trying to change.  The usual advice is to wait for at least 9-12 months for most of the swelling to go away before undertaking a revision procedure.  However, if the change you're looking for isn't going to be affected by swelling, such as a displace graft or residual bony dorsal irregularity, we don't hesitate to proceed sooner, within 3-6 months even, in selected cases.  Please consult with your surgeon to determine if the changes your are seeking are affected by swelling resolution.  Hope this helps and good luck!

Tom D. Wang, MD
Portland Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Six months minimum for revision rhinoplasty.

Dear Pochahantas in Ukiah:

Good question. Six months is generally the minimum. It depends on what was done the first time.

Were you planning on having the original surgeon do the revision, or are you seeking second opinion from others and may have it done elsewhere? Usual surgeon knows your nose best and knows how it is healing and when he could reasonably perform the revision rhinoplasty. Generally, it is better to wait longer than have it done too soon. There is an old saying from one of the great plastic surgeons, “Never do today what you can honorably put off for tomorrow.”

Is it possible that you could be helped by nonsurgical revision rhinoplasty? Temporary or permanent? You should look into that. Many patients are not aware that there are some excellent techniques available to save you from having another operation. It saves you time and money. So check that out.

Best wishes,

Robert Kotler, MD, FACS
Over 4,500 nasal procedures performed

Robert Kotler, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.